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Maximo Anderson

Noticias de section_global/temas

Colombia busca la paz sin cocaína
Colombia busca la paz sin cocaína
América Latina

Colombia busca la paz sin cocaína

Además de desarmar a los rebeldes de las FARC, el acuerdo de paz de Colombia también busca ponerle fin al comercio ilícito de drogas, pero eso requiere que el gobierno invierta dinero en el campo, y que ofrezca una alternativa viable para el floreciente mercado de la coca cuyo valor es de $88 mil millones a nivel mundial.
Maximo Anderson
Colombia seeks peace, eradication of cocaine
Colombia seeks peace, eradication of cocaine
Univision News

Colombia seeks peace, eradication of cocaine

Besides disarming the rebel FARC army, Colombia's peace accord also seeks to end the illegal drug trade. But that requires the state to pour money into the countryside and provide a viable alternative to the booming coca market, worth $88 billion worldwide.
Maximo Anderson
In photos: Peace in Colombia rests on finding an alternative to cocaine production
In photos: Peace in Colombia rests on finding an alternative to cocaine production
Univision News

In photos: Peace in Colombia rests on finding an alternative to cocaine production

Colombia is at a pivotal moment as former FARC fighters have begun handing in their weapons as part of a historic peace agreement. An essential part of the peace accord is also to end the illegal drug trade, but that requires the state to pour money into the countryside, and provide a viable alternative to the booming coca market worth $88 billion worldwide.
Maximo Anderson
In photos: Can there be peace in Colombia without cocaine?
In photos: Can there be peace in Colombia without cocaine?
Univision News

In photos: Can there be peace in Colombia without cocaine?

Colombia is at a pivotal moment as former FARC fighters have begun handing in their arsenal of weapons as part of the disarmament process agreed to in last year's historic peace agreement, ending 52 years of conflict. An essential part of the peace accord is also to end the illegal drug trade, but that requires the state to pour money into the countryside, and provide a viable alternative to the booming coca market worth $88 billion worldwide.
Maximo Anderson
Epidemic of violence sweeping Brazil
Epidemic of violence sweeping Brazil
Univision News

Epidemic of violence sweeping Brazil

Brazil stood out last year for having 17 of the 50 most violent cities in the world, part of a worsening trend across the hemisphere. Among those killed were 197 "land defenders" who seek to protect natural resources, wildlife and indigenous territories.
Maximo Anderson