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Second Chances

Noticias de section_global/temas

The first year after leaving prison is harder for Hispanics
The first year after leaving prison is harder for Hispanics
Univision News

The first year after leaving prison is harder for Hispanics

Contrary to what some may think, people who commit violent crimes are less likely to return to jail than those who commit other types of offenses. Studies show the number of former inmates who end up returning to prison for a new crime, as well as just how big a challenge that ‘Second chance’ is.
Tamoa Calzadilla y Ana María Carrano
Univision News

"It's not just one person who is sentenced, but the whole family"

Yraida Guanipa spent 11 years in prison and now defends the rights of those returning to society from incarceration. After her release, she had a hard time finding employment due to her criminal history. She says she has drawn strength from her children: "the second chance to become a mother again was the most important." This video is part of the project 'Second Chances'.
These organizations help those leaving prison: jobs, healthcare, emotional support and housing
These organizations help those leaving prison: jobs, healthcare, emotional support and housing
Univision News

These organizations help those leaving prison: jobs, healthcare, emotional support and housing

Some cover the entire United States, while others attend to people in each state. In different ways, government and non-governmental organizations support people on their difficult journey towards reinsertion into society, and their opportunity for a ‘second chance’ (*).
Univision News

Graduating was a positive thing, even though it was behind bars

Adrián Vázquez was released in 2014 after spending more than 20 years in prison. He now lives with his family in Los Angeles, has completed a bachelor's degree at Cal State Long Beach and is preparing to take the LSAT. Watch this video about his story, his struggles with family separation and how grateful he is to have a new life opportunity. The video is part of the 'Second Chance' project.
Univision fellowship offers six months of training and journalism experience to formerly incarcerated people
Univision fellowship offers six months of training and journalism experience to formerly incarcerated people
Univision

Univision fellowship offers six months of training and journalism experience to formerly incarcerated people

Fellows must live in California, Arizona, and Florida. Email a resume, a cover letter, 2 professional or academic references, and no more than 3 work samples (if available; not required) to unicontigo@univision.net.