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Awakening the 'sleeping giant': Latinos

“In 2017 Latinos will be the majority of entrants into the U.S. workforce. Every 30 seconds two non-Hispanics retire while one Hispanic turns 18.”
Opinión
Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Business & Social Entrepreneurship, Rollins College. President, Human Capital Development
2016-11-07T10:20:20-05:00

The demographics in the United States are changing. Our nation is more diverse, more global, and less monolingual than ever. And the increase in the Latino population is a principal driver of those changes.

To put the growing Latino/Hispanic population in perspective consider the following: There are 53 million Latinos in the U.S. Spanish is the second most spoken language.

This group is expected to spend around $1.7 trillion annually in the U.S., which would place it at 16th GDP in the world out of 193 countries and with more potential then the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, and China).

While the average age among whites is 40, it is 27 among Latinos (Rodriguez, 2008). Latinos are the largest demographic group among millennials, making up 44%.

Beginning next year, in 2017, Latinos will be the majority of entrants into the U.S. workforce. Every 30 seconds two non-Hispanics retire while one Hispanic turns 18. For every Anglo that dies, one is born; for every Latino that dies eight are born.

Florida, California, Texas and Arizona -- just to name a few -- can be seen as models for the demographic shifts that our country will witness in the coming decades. Presently there are 22 cities where minorities make up the majority; in 21 of these cities it is the Hispanic demographic that makes this so.

We are likely to see the effects of this demographic tomorrow in the presidential election. It is estimated that between 13 and 15 million Latinos will vote in this presidential election. While Latinos have traditionally not voted in high numbers, this is one election that seems to be turning out differently. This will be of particular interest to the future of each respective political party since it is estimated that close to 80% will vote Democratic.

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RELACIONADOS:OpinionVoto HispanoElecciones 2016
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