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10 stories of migrants on the caravan: engineers, disabled people, gang victims (in photos)

Their lives coincided in the journey north to Tijuana, and some have stories that stand out from the majority of migrants. Univision Noticias spoke to some of the more unusual cases.
4 Dic 2018 – 12:11 PM EST
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An engineering couple: Melany Murillo is 30 years old and an agricultural engineer. Her husband Yonari Perdomo, 25, studied the same degree at the National University of Agriculture in Honduras. They joined the migrant caravan because of the lack of job opportunities in their country. "I was looking for a job for two years and I never found one," said Melany, who is now five months pregnant. "Maybe some country values how much I've tried studying and takes me in," she says. Crédito: Isaias Alvarado
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The migrant in a wheelchair. On October 15 he left his native Honduras on a pair of crutches, but in Mexico City he could no longer manage. Since then, Rafael Peralta, 33, uses a wheelchair. He says he was born with deformed feet and worked as a peasant farmer. Now his goal is to work in a restaurant in the United States. "I would tell President Trump not to judge us, he says we are gangsters, murderers ... How am I going to be that, in my state," he says. Crédito: Isaias Alvarado
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The father and his 4 year-old daughter. Before joining the exodus of Central American migrants, Marvella, 4, cried for her father, Carlos Vázquez, to take her. The two Hondurans began a journey of more than a month and are now stranded in the border city of Tijuana. "I would like to find a job and leave her in a nursery," says Vázquez, 34. "She wanted to come with me, I felt sorry to leave her. I don't regret it. She's my daughter and I have to take care of her," he explains. Crédito: Isaias Alvarado
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Family in extreme poverty. On a tiny salary from washing clothes and cleaning houses, Rosa Dubón looked after her six children in Honduras. She reached the US border the two youngest; Walter, aged two, and Jose, aged four. "My dream is that they can get a good education and make more of themselves, what I never had," says Rosa, 34 years, between sobs. "We are here because of violence, poverty and crime," added her husband, Walter, 28. Crédito: Isaias Alvarado
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A victim of the Maras. Two years ago, Carlos Flores says four gang members cut off part of his thumb. "I had a business and I almost got stabbed to death because I did not give them money," says the 25-year-old Honduran who has several scars from cuts he received on his left forearm and right shoulder. He managed to flee and relatives found him bleeding. "I was dying," he recalls. He arrived in Tijuana with his two children, aged one and five. Crédito: Isaias Alvarado
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One woman, two caravans: In one year, 44-year-old Honduran, Sandra Pérez, has crossed Mexico twice by train, bus, hitching rides and by foot. On the first occasion she joined the caravan in March and reached Tijuana. She decided not to try and cross the border when she learned that asylum seekers were spending long periods in immigration detention centers. Two months ago she returned to Chiapas to accompany the second exodus to accompany Genesis, the five year-old daughter of a cousin. "I hope they grant asylum to everyone, because most of us don't want to stay in Mexico," she says. Crédito: Isaias Alvarado
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He fled with his son after a death threat. Jesús Chávez fled Honduras after receiving a death threat from a neighbor who murdered one of his relatives, he says. "He drove slowly by the house in his car carrying a gun and said he was going to kill us too, because he thought we were going to take revenge." He carries evidence of his case, including a copy of the relative's death certificate and another copy of the Honduran prosecutors' investigation, which he hopes he will be able to present in an asylum application. Crédito: Isaias Alvarado
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The young man who emigrated because of hunger. He is 22 years old, but his anecdotes sounds like those of someone older. Cristopher Zepeda wore out his shoes walking a large part of the journey from his native Honduras to the border city of Tijuana. "In my country there is suffering, a lot of hunger, there is no work," he says. His plan is to work, either in Mexico or the United States. "Whatever it takes to not go hungry," he insists. Crédito: Isaias Alvarado
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The bricklayer lookign for job. "My salary didn't go far," says José Enrique Solís Morales, a 21-year-old Guatemalan who earned his living as a bricklayer and washing cars. He says he earned 350 quetzales a week, or about $45 dollars. He joined the caravan on October 17 when it went through his community. He left promising to help his family. "I do not regret having come," he said at a migrant camp in Tijuana. Crédito: Isaias Alvarado
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The boy who is returning defeated. Junior Amaya joined the caravan on October 17, and dreamed of working in the US. He endured rain, cold, hunger, abuse ... but finally last week he thought about Christmas and his family back home, and realized that he had little chance of achieving his goal. So he decided there was no point keeping going. "I'm defeated, but here it's like being imprisoned, I'd better go home," he said outside a migrant shelter in the city of Tijuana. Crédito: Isaias Alvarado
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