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The lost art of post mortem photography in Bolivia

Julio Cordero Benavides, a retired Bolivian, has dedicated his life to portraits and to preserving the legacy of two other photographers: his father and his grandfather who cultivated a custom that was booming from the middle of the nineteenth century until the beginning of the twentieth: that of portraying the dead as a last memory for their families. Here are some snapshots from their archive.
20 Abr 2017 – 07:27 PM EDT
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A postmortem portrait from 1915. Photo by Julio Cordero Castillo. Crédito: Archivo Cordero
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A bereaved group view the corpse of a loved one (1920). Photo by Julio Cordero Castillo. Crédito: Archivo Cordero
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Celebration of the end of a mourning period (1915). Photo by Julio Cordero Castillo. Crédito: Archivo Cordero.
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'Guatemalan girl' (1920). Photo by Julio Cordero Castillo. Crédito: Archivo Cordero
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The Cordero archive not only contains photos related to death. In these images, a thief disguises himself as a woman (1930). Photo by Julio Cordero. Crédito: Archivo Cordero.
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For years, the grandfather and the father of Julio Cordero photographed giants and midgets as well as criminals and prostitutes, well dressed figures of the period, peasants in sandals and old clothes. In this image, 'Camacho, the giant. (1935). Photo by Julio Cordero Castillo. Archivo Cordero
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The three generations of photographers: Julio Cordero Benavides (left), Julio Cordero Castillo (middle) and Julio Cordero Ordóñez (right). Crédito: Archivo Cordero
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RELACIONADOS:Latin America

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