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Photos: Activists push for greater access to abortion in El Salvador

Abortion is prohibited in El Salvador in all cases, including rape and when a mother's life is in danger. With the support of international human rights groups, some inside the country are pushing for changes to the law. On September 28, 2017, activists gathered in downtown San Salvador to voice opposition to the draconian law, which they say causes unjust death and imprisonment.
6 Dic 2017 – 12:46 PM EST
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Hundreds showed up to march against the country's harsh abortion laws. El Salvador consistently ranks among the countries with the strictest reproductive health policies in the world. Women routinely die due to unsafe abortions.
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Sara García, a campaigner with the Citizens' Group for the Decriminalization of Abortion, is a leading voice in the fight to decriminalize abortion in El Salvador. She supports a new bill introduced last year that would allow abortion in cases of rape when the victim is a minor or a victim of human trafficking, when the fetus is not viable, or to protect a woman's health or life.
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Froilan Sosa, a community leader, attended the protest to express his support for women who suffer under the laws that criminalize abortion in El Salvador. "They are laws that are made by a legislative assembly full of men and their machismo is applied in the law," explained Sosa.
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Protesters staged a mock funeral, honoring women who have died during childbirth due to obstetric emergency. In El Salvador, doctors regularly deny life-saving abortions to women out of fear of being reported to authorities and sent to jail.
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According to El Salvador’s Ministry of Health, in the three years between 2005 and 2008, there were 19,290 abortions in the country, 27.6% of them minors. According to the World Health Organization, in countries where abortion is completely banned, only one in four abortions are safe.
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A protester wears a mask portraying right-wing lawmaker Ricardo Andrés Velásquez Parker, who introduced a bill last year that could increase the maximum penalty of abortion from eight to 50 years.
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RELACIONADOS:Latin America

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