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The Dragunov sniper rifle, an old friend of Daniel Ortega

The Dragunov first appeared in Nicaragua after the Sandinista guerrilla army of Ortega overthrew dictator Anastasio Somoza in 1979. It is now used against protesters in anti-government protests.
11 Ago 2018 – 03:02 PM EDT
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Nicaragua's special operations police patrol the Monimbo neighborhood of the city of Masaya after taking control in clashes with anti-government demonstrations on July 18, 2018. Photo by Marvin Recinos / AFP / Getty Images
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Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) talks to Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega (R) after he arrived at Managua's international airport on July 11, 2014. Photo by Reuters / Cesar Perez. Crédito: David Adams
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Named after its developer - Evgeny Dragunov – the rifle was developed by the Soviet military as a marksman’s rifle in 1963 and proved itself in the Afghan and Chechen wars. Similar to the more famous AK-47, the Dragunov is manufactured by the same company, ‘Kalashnikov Concern.
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The Dagunov is known for its durability and has been used by snipers in conflicts around the world. In this photo, a Free Syrian Army fighter practices with a Dragunov during training exercises outside Homs, June 2012. Photo by Reuters. Crédito: Reuters
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Special operations unit of the Nicaraguan police in Masaya, July 17, 2018. Photo by Reuters. Crédito: OSWALDO RIVAS/REUTERS
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Special operations unit of the Nicaraguan police in Masaya, July 17, 2018. Photo by Reuters. Crédito: OSWALDO RIVAS/REUTERS
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Nicaragua's special operations police patrol the Monimbo neighborhood, one with a Dragunov, in the city of Masaya after clashes with anti-government demonstrations, on July 18, 2018. Crédito: Marvin Recinos/AFP/Getty Images
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Special Operations police unit, some holding Dragunov rifles, celebrating after taking Monimbo, July 17, 2018. Photo by El 19 Digital.
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Close up of Dragunovs (on right) being carried by Special Operations police unit celebrating after taking Monimbo, July 17, 2018. Photo by El 19 Digital.
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Nicaraguan police officer with bolt action hunting rifle in Masaya, July 13, 2018. Crédito: Courtesy, Cristobal Venegas
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Paramilitaries in a truck in the neighborhood of Monimbo de Masaya, July 18, 2018, after clashes with anti-government protesters. One is armed with the Dragunov. Crédito: Marvin Recinos/AFP.
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Tifani Roberts interviews 'Comandante Guardabarranco' in Masaya, July 11, 2018. "I went to the funerals of several friends killed with bullets that destroyed their heads," he said. "Some we had to pick up their bodies, it is very dramatic to try to ... pick up their brains ... in a plastic bag so that it would not be left lying there." Crédito: Univision
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On April 20, Alvaro Conrado, a 15-year-old boy, was carrying water for students trapped in the National Engineering University when he was mortally wounded in the neck and face. Several witnesses claimed that the snipers posted near the National Stadium had fired. Crédito: Uriel Molina
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Álvaro Conrado, 15, was killed in an anti-government protest by a bullet in the neck. "Nothing can justify shooting-to-kill practices, nor the indiscriminate use of lethal force against a crowd," said José Miguel Vivanco, director for the Americas at Human Rights Watch.
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Friends and relatives cry next to the coffin of Álvaro Conrado (15), a high school student killed during a protest by a shot in the neck. Crédito: Getty Images
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Autopsy reports examined by the IACHR found that "numerous victims were treated for bullet wounds to the head, eyes, neck and chest, as well as to the back, indicating the arbitrary use of lethal force or extrajudicial executions. " Crédito: Univision
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These X-rays are of a victim who died in a protest against the government of Daniel Ortega. It shows a single gunshot to the head. Crédito: Wilfredo Miranda Aburto
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The wake for Darwin Potosme, Masaya, July 18, 2018. His friends say that he was killed by a sniper bullet that pierced his eye and broke his skull. Crédito: LA PRENSA/Manuel Esquivel
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Protester showing a bullet fired during an anti-government protest on May 30 in Managua. Photo by Wilfredo Miranda Aburto.
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Doctors treat injured people on May 30 during anti-government protests in Managua. Photo by Wilfredo Miranda Aburto.
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