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In photos: Lt Robert Paz and his family taken at the time of his death in 1989

The death of 1st Lt Robert Paz on December 16, 1989 was one of the triggers cited by President George H Bush to justify his decision to invade Panama three days later in order to overthrow the dictator, General Manuel Antonio Noriega. (Read full story)
16 Dic 2019 – 06:25 PM EST
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Lt Robert Paz (left) in his Marine uniform and with his family (left to right); his mother Mary Alice Fisher, brother Michael Paz Fisher, and his father Jaime Paz Pizarro in the back row. In front: Robert Paz Fisher and his other brother Alex Paz Fisher. Photo provided to El Tiempo by the Paz Fisher family and published Dec 20, 1989. Crédito: Courtesy of El Tiempo / David Maris / Univision
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Lt Robert Paz Couresty of El Tiempo / David Maris / Univision
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In his application at Michigan State, Paz wrote that his American mother, Mary Alice Fisher, was a teacher from Dallas and his Colombian father, Jaime Paz, was a travel agent. It was in Colombia, Paz said, that he developed a desire to pursue a career in animal science due to time he spent there on a coffee and banana farm, where his family also raised cattle. Courtesy of El Tiempo / David Maris / Univision
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The day after his death the Marines arranged a U.S. military plane to fly Lr Robert Paz’s body to Colombia, where his parents were living. The family were waiting at Bogota airport where Capt. Richard Haddad says he delivered the U.S. flag to Paz’s mother and spoke briefly with Paz’s younger brother, before flying back to Panama in time for the invasion which began 48 hours later. Seen here with his family (left to right); his mother Mary Alice Fisher, brother Michael Paz Fisher, and his father Jaime Paz Pizarro in the back row. In front: Robert Paz Fisher and his other brother Alex Paz Fisher. Crédito: Courtesy of El Tiempo / David Maris / Univision
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Lt Robert Paz's brothers and father trying to hide their grief after learning of his death. This photo was taken by El Tiempo of Bogota. Crédito: Courtesy of El Tiempo / David Maris / Univision
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The Colombian newspaper, El Tiempo, published this article about the death of Lt Robert Paz on Dec 20, 1989, hours after the invasion of Panama had begun. Crédito: Courtesy of El Tiempo / David Maris / Univision
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The Colombian newspaper, El Tiempo, published this article about the death of Lt Robert Paz on Dec 20, 1989, hours after the invasion of Panama had begun. Crédito: Courtesy of El Tiempo / David Maris / Univision
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“Circumstances have given Robert a certain notoriety which would have made him very uncomfortable,” his mother, Mary Paz, wrote to the president of Michigan State University after a memorial ceremony Jan 11 in his honor. A copy of her letter was provided to Univision by the university. “He was happiest when feeding the calves at MSU farms or slushing through the mud with the Marines,” she added. Courtesy of Michigan State University.
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The front page of the Washington Post on the day after Gen Manuel Noriega surrendered to U.S. forces in Panama. It also includes a report on the death of Lt Robert Paz, describing how he was killed by Panamanian soldiers who opened fire on the car he was in as it tried to make a speedy getaway after being stopped at a checkpoint near Noriega's military headquarters. Courtesy of the Washington Post.
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