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In photos: How the case of Mexican teenager Sergio Adrián Hernández made it to the Supreme Court

The family of Sergio Hernández, who died in Ciudad Juárez at age 15, is asking the U.S. Supreme Court whether it can sue the border agent who fired at the boy from El Paso, Texas.
15 Jun 2017 – 03:18 PM EDT
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A cross-border death: The deceased body of Sergio Adrián Hernández, age 15, on June 7, 2010, in Mexican territory. The bullet that killed him was launched from the United States by a Border Patrol agent. Crédito: Luis Hinojos/EFE
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A mass funeral. The funeral procession left the boy's home in the western part of Ciudad Juárez, made a stop at a Catholic church and ended up in an elevated cemetery overlooking one of the poorest areas in the city. Crédito: Jesús Alcázar/EFE
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An inconsolable father: Jesús Hernández during his son's funeral in Ciudad Juarez on June 10, 2010. The father did not live with Sergio or his mother. Crédito: Jesús Alcázar/AFP/Getty Images
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"In memory of Keko": Relatives and friends of Sergio Hernández after the burial of the teen in Ciudad Juárez, on June 10, 2010. Crédito: Jesús Alcázar/AFP/Getty Images
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"The Migra killed me": The death of Sergio Hernández led to protests in Ciudad Juárez. The Mexican government tried - unsuccessfully - to extradite the U.S. agent to try him there. Crédito: Alejandro Bringas/EFE
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Protests. On August 18, 2011, relatives of Mexican Sergio Adrián Hernández Güereca protest under the border crossing between Ciudad Juárez and El Paso. A few days earlier a federal judge in Texas had dismissed the family's lawsuit, but his lawyers later brought the case to an appeals court. Crédito: Alejandro Bringas/EFE
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Seven years. Jesús Hernández contemplates a homage to his son on June 7, 2012, two years after his death. In 2017 the Supreme Court hears the case. Crédito: Jesús Alcázar/AFP/GettyImages
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Arguments in the Supreme Court. Attorney Bob Hilliard, who represents the Hernández Güereca family, speaks to the media after presenting his arguments on February 21, 2017, before the highest judicial institution in the United States. Crédito: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images
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Opposing arguments. Attorney Randolph Ortega, who defends Border Patrol agent Jesús Mesa, stands before the Supreme Court, in Washington D.C. According to him, the Constitution of the United States can not protect Sergio Hernández in any way because he died in Mexico. Crédito: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images
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Just one question. The Supreme Court must decide whether the Hernández Güereca family can sue the border agent for the death of her son. If they win, a new judicial process would begin against Jesús Mesa Jr. Here, María Guadalupe Güereca shows images of her son, Sergio Hernández. Crédito: Damià S. Bonmatí
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