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In photos: An intimate glimpse into the journey of the migrant 'caravan'

Univision reporter Pedro Ultreras accompanied the group of Central American migrants all the way from the border of Guatemala and Mexico. An up close look at the children, mothers and grandmothers who made the journey seeking a new life and safety from gang violence in their home countries.
30 May 2018 – 01:59 PM EDT
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The caravan of 1,500 migrants crossed the border with Guatemala into Mexico. At one point along the way, the group was divided between those who had money to travel by bus and those who had to take the dangerous train ride on 'La Bestia,' a freight train where stowaways run the risk of falling, losing a limb or their life. Crédito: Pedro Utreras
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Genesis Martínez, a 18-year-old Honduran girl, traveled in the caravan with Cesar, her two month old son. Genesis made it to the border with the United States along with approximately 200 other mothers and children. They were handed over to the immigration authorities to request asylum in the United States. Pedro Ultreras
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Éricka Ruiz is 26 years old and her son Bryan is three. They spent two days and three nights on the freight train 'La Bestia'. They are from Honduras and their goal is to reach Tijuana (Mexico) to request asylum in San Diego (USA). Pedro Ultreras
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At one point along the way, little Bryan sucked his finger while his mother slept on 'La Bestia.' "It was very cold that morning," Utreras wrote in his Instagram account. Crédito: Pedro Ultreras
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The group that traveled by bus did not have it much easier. Sometimes they were so cramped that several children had to share a seat. At one point the buses traveled parallel to the border in the state of Sonora, Mexico, adjacent to Arizona. Crédito: Pedro Ultreras
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Men women and children exhausted by the tough journey were divided between those who chose to apply for asylum in the United States, those who chose to stay in Mexico and those who planned to cross the desert illegally. From the moment that President Donald Trump learned of the caravan he accused them of being criminals and ordered US National Guard troops to the border. Crédito: Pedro Ultreras
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"Doña Blanca Valles, 65, is a great-grandmother. Ultreras met her on La Bestia and she won him over. "She told me that she was afraid to get on (La Bestia) but was helped by several men and overcame fear while enjoying the landscapes of Mexico," explained Ultreras. Valles was traveling with her family from El Salvador. Crédito: Pedro Ultreras
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Three generations of migrants crossing Mexico on the freight train known as 'The Beast'; a grandmother, mother and grandchild, all fleeing violence and death threats in Central America to seek asylum in the United States. April 2018. Crédito: Pedro Ultreras
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Bryan, a 16-year-old Honduran, brushes his teeth on La Bestia while at a station Sonora. Crédito: Pedro Ultreras
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Guatemalan Aidé Hernández with Clesner, her five-month-old son. Together with another 500 migrants, they await the departure of La Bestia, which will take them from Guanajuato to Guadalajara. Hernandez was hoping to reach Sacramento, California, with two more children and two nephews, all minors. Pedro Ultreras
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Ultreras described the scene on La Bestia: "My cameraman and I are the only ones standing. The others had little space to lie down. The floor is cold like a coffin. The wind blows so cold that it stings the bones, and the creaking of the wagons shakes the skin ... The beast has accelerated speed. The noise is deafening and the wind is so cold." Crédito: Pedro Ultreras
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Most of the migrants are Hondurans and several of them fly the flag of their country. US Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, ordered prosecutors and judges be sent to the Mexican border to quickly process the cases of migrants from the caravan who arrive requesting political asylum. Crédito: Pedro Ultreras
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"The big Caravan of People from Honduras, now coming across Mexico and heading to our 'Weak Laws' Border, had better be stopped before it gets there," President Trump wrote on Twitter. The caravan is an annual challenge organized the last five years by the group Pueblo Sin Fronteras, in order to give greater visibility to the crisis of violence and corruption in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. They receive help from humanitarian organizations in Hermosillo (Mexico), on their way to the US border. Pedro Ultreras
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Another one-year-old, also named Bryan, waits in the arms of his mother for the departure of La Bestia in northern Sinaloa. Pedro Ultreras
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Journalist Pedro Ultreras has traveled on La Bestia on several occasions. He accompanied the caravan from the beginning, in the south of Mexico. His iamges can be seen on his Instagram account (@pedroultrerastv). Crédito: Pedro Ultreras
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RELACIONADOS:Immigration

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