publicidad
Mario Rodríguez, head of the Hispanic 100 group in California, and Jovita Carranza, who worked in George W. Bush's administration, with Donald Trump.

Trump now says he plans to legalize some undocumented immigrants

Trump now says he plans to legalize some undocumented immigrants

Sources tell Univision that Trump plans to announce a major shift on immigration policy next week. The Republican candidate met Saturday with Hispanic leaders who said he told them he regrets prior comments about Mexicans.

Mario Rodríguez, head of the Hispanic 100 group in California, and Jovit...
Mario Rodríguez, head of the Hispanic 100 group in California, and Jovita Carranza, who worked in George W. Bush's administration, with Donald Trump.

Important Notice: This article was written three months ago. After Trump’s victory it has gone viral on social media outlets. However, the content does not reflect the current proposals of the President-elect Trump, especially in regards to the massive deportation of undocumented immigrants.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump plans to present an immigration plan in Colorado Thursday that will include finding a way to legalize millions of undocumented immigrants, according to three people who attended a meeting between the candidate and Hispanic leaders on Saturday at Trump Tower in New York.

"I really liked that Trump acknowledged that there is a big problem with the 11 million [undocumented] people who are here, and that deporting them is neither possible nor humane,” said Jacob Monty, a Texas immigration lawyer who attended the meeting.

Lee esta nota en español

If true, Trump's plan would stand in sharp contrast to his previous statements about immigrants during the campaign. During the primaries, the New York property tycoon promised to build a wall along the border with Mexico and to deport all undocumented immigrants.

The possible reversal over immigration policy by the Republican candidate would not be without precedent after Trump has shifted his position on a variety of issues during his campaign, from banning Muslims to taxes, minimum wages and and abortion.

Polls show Trump has alienated many minority voters and Republican party strategists have urged him to tone down his rhetoric about immigrants, especially Hispanics who make up a growing share of registered voters - about 10% in November.

publicidad

Republican National Committee spokesperson Helen Aguirre was also present at the meeting and confirmed that the candidate is working on unveiling a plan. "Trump was very categorical in saying that he's seeking a fair immigration reform," Aguirre said. "He wants to listen to everyone and announce his conclusions in the coming days."

Trump told the group of conservative Hispanic leaders he would announce a plan to grant legal status "that wouldn't be citizenship but would allow them to be here without fear of deportation," Monty said.

The campaign has so far not provided details of the plan, and Trump spokesman Steven Cheung, said in a statement that Trump's position remains unchanged on immigration.

"Mr. Trump said nothing today that he hasn't said many times before ... enforce our immigration laws, uphold the Constitution and be fair and humane while putting American workers first,” Cheung said.

When he launched his presidential campaign in June last year, Trump linked immigration and crime. "When Mexico sends its people they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists, and some, I assume, are good people," he said at the time.

According to one of the meeting's attendees, Trump said Saturday that he regretted having made those comments, though it was not clear if he had issued an apology.

In a statement on Saturday responding to Trump's meeting with Hispanics, Hillary Clinton’s campaign political director, Amanda Rentería, recalled the billionaire's prior disparaging comments. "If true, this is a cynical attempt from Donald Trump to distract from his dangerous policies that he doubled down on just this week in a new ad. Donald Trump will be Donald Trump and what's clear is that he's dangerous for the Latino community," she said.

publicidad

The meeting lasted an hour and a half and among those also present were his two top campaign staff, Steve Bannon and Kellyanne Conway, who joined Trump this week following a shake-up of his team.

The Republican National Committee (RNC) chairman Reince Priebus described three meeting as part of "our expansive effort to engage the Hispanic community."

Present were members of a National Hispanic Advisory Council For Trump, a group that includes state representatives, evangelical pastors and executives such as Javier Polit, chief information officer at the Coca-Cola Company.

According to sources who were present at the meeting, Trump spoke in a conciliatory tone. He began by welcoming everyone, then asked attendees what they thought he should do for the Hispanic community. He took notes during the whole meeting.

The Republican candidate said that his main priority was how to handle the 11 million undocumented immigrants who are now in the country, the sources said.

“Trump is aware that he cannot deport 11 million people,” says Lola Zinke, wife of Ryan Zinke, a Republican congressman from Montana, who is a former Navy Seal.

Zinke, the daughter of a Peruvian, is a San Diego lawyer familiar with illegal immigration issues, who says she believes deportation is not the solution. “It doesn’t make sense to force undocumented [immigrants] to go back to their countries to regularize their situation. Trump himself mentioned a possible solution: let them do it at the embassies or consulates of their countries,” she said.

publicidad

Other people present at the meeting backed that idea, explaining that the candidate said he did not like the idea of forcing undocumented immigrants to go back to their countries to regularize their immigration status, and that it would make sense to allow them to do so without leaving the United States.

“No one wants criminals or rapists here,” Zinke said. “But it’s impossible to deport 11 million people. Trump realizes the contributions the Hispanic community has made to our military. He understands Hispanic values and the contributions of our community,” she added.

Official details of the Trump plan remain unknown. But those who were present at the meeting said it would include some form of legalizing the status of some undocumented immigrants.

“Being eligible will require that people haven’t committed serious crimes or aren’t recently arrived,” Monty said.

The plan would need the support of Congress, but Monty said he had faith in Trump as “someone who has made deals.”

He added: “Trump is capable of sitting down with his party to negotiate and his opponent isn’t. Congress is controlled by Republicans. How will Hillary Clinton move forward with reform?”

Upon exiting the meeting, evangelical pastor Mario Bramnick said he had spoken with Trump about immigration on three occasions and that he always believed that Trump wanted to come up with a detailed plan to address undocumented immigrants in a humane way.

“He’s always understood the problems of the 11 million people that are here and are good people,” Bramnick said. “The first thing is to establish the safety of this country and make it clear that criminals cannot stay. But there are good people and we have to propose reform to discuss what to do with these people,” he said.

publicidad

Several Hispanic leaders told Trump that Hispanics weren't happy about his more aggressive comments. "He told us that what he'd said was one thing and what he'd meant to say was another," said Jovita Carranza, a Hispanic businesswoman and deputy administrator for the U.S. Small Business Administration under President George W. Bush.

"What he meant to say is that there's a lot of crime involved in these difficult situations that Hispanics go through on the border,” said Carranza, who attended Saturday’s meeting in New York.

“They pay money to cross [the border] and along the way women are raped and they let others die in trucks. Trump said he was referring to that type of crime and to people who are criminals who shouldn't be part of our society," she added.

Carranza said Trump knows the Hispanic community because many of his employees are of Mexican origin, and that he values their contribution to the economy and how much they care about education.

María Ramírez and David Adams contributed to this article.

publicidad
publicidad
Two reporters from Univision News followed the track of Hurricane Maria, starting from the southeast where the eye made landfall all the way to the capital. This is what they saw from the road ...
Presidents don't usually pardon criminals until they have been sentenced or have at least expressed some regret, but this was not the case with Arpaio, who spoke to Univision News two weeks after being forgiven by his ally, Donald Trump.
The weather station in Key West, Florida, is sending weather balloons into the atmosphere to measure the powerful category 5 hurricane, which currently has winds of 175 miles per hour.
The Trump administration on Tuesday rescinded the DACA program that President Barack Obama introduced to protect the young undocumented immigrants known as Dreamers. Sessions said the program would be phased out over six months to allow Congress time to have another go at passing legislation.
Two brothers graduated from Harvard and Middlebury. They grew up in Houston and are practicing Christians. "Like "good Americans," they like Taco Bell. They have lived most of their lives in the United States and have a simple request for the president: "Do not get rid of DACA."
During a meeting in the Oval office Friday, the president was asked by reporters about the future of DACA, to which he responded that a decision was coming soon. "We love the dreamers, we love everyone," he added.
Nilsa Huete is an undocumented Honduran immigrant living in Key West, Florida. In the last five months, five of her family members have been arrested by agents from the Monroe County Sheriff's Office. Now she’s fighting against the deportation of her daughter and brother.
The former Arizona sheriff pardoned by President Trump is one of the most unpopular figures in the Hispanic community. For 24 years he was sheriff of the fourth largest county in the country and was convicted in July 2017 of ignoring a court order to stop his officers from racial profiling of Hispanics.
The Univision News anchor sat down with Chris Barker, leader of the "Loyal White Knights," a branch of the Ku Klux Klan. The interview was part of the special that aired Sunday on Aqui y Ahora.
A crowd surrounds a young man in a Trump hat and t-shirt, and draped in an Israeli flag, on Boston Common.
Jorge Ramos spoke with the musician's lawyer after he was detained by the Nicolas Maduro regime. The attorney said Arteaga had been "tortured". The Univision reporter asks: #FreedomforWuilly
The new defense team of alleged drug trafficker Joaquin 'El Chapo' Guzman could face a legal hurdle to represent him in federal court of New York, after Univision News learned that his attorney Jeffrey Lichtman previously represented a key potential witness in the trial. That could represent a conflict of interest in the case, experts say.
The former Republican presidential candidate says a Senate immigration proposal that would cut immigration in half is flawed, but he backs idea of merit-based points system.
Republican senators continue this week to seek ways to repeal the existing health care law known as Obamacare. Their proposal includes a halt in reimbursement for Medicaid patients who visit Planned Parenthood’s clinics. This is the testimony of a 27-year-old woman who relies on the reproductive health services offered by the organization.
The footage shows a man wearing a badge, apparently from the local sheriff’s department, and claiming to be bail bonds agent. A lawyer then rebukes and questions his authority.
Maty Muy, a Guatemalan immigrant, went to renew her work permit at an ICE office and ended up facing a nightmare. Authorities placed a GPS monitor on her ankle and sent her husband to a detention facility. Now, she has taken over the family business – a tire and auto repair shop – while facing deportation.
Voluntarios en moto recorren las calles de San Gregorio en Xochimilco para llevar ayuda a quien lo necesite
El terremoto dejó casas y calles destruidas que dificultan el acceso a San Gregorio, pero voluntarios luchan contra toda dificultad para ir en motocicletas y repartir artículos de primera necesidad.
Gala, una de las heroínas caninas que ayudan en las labores de rescate en México
Julio Velásquez, coordinador de la Unidad Canina de la Dirección General de Prevención y Protección Civil de la UNAM, explicó el operativo que realizan con los perros para detectar personas vivas de entre los escombros.
Aquí y Ahora – 17 de septiembre, 2017
El impacto directo del huracán Irma deja irreconocible a una isla de la Florida.
Al Punto con Jorge Ramos – 17 de septiembre, 2017
Cristina Jiménez, la directora de United We Dream, habla sobre la nueva estrategia de los soñadores. Laurene Powell Jobs habla sobre el presidente Trump y los inmigrantes.
publicidad
Desesperación y preocupación entre los habitantes de Jojutla, México, tras terremoto
Residentes del municipio relatan la pesadilla que han vivido tras el terremoto del pasado martes y aseguran necesitar medicamentos, víveres y herramientas para suplir algunas necesidades. Cerca de 2,000 inmuebles resultaron gravemente afectados.
El día después del paso de María los puertorriqueños encuentran una isla rota
Nuestros reporteros realizaron un recorrido desde Yabucoa hasta San Juan y confirmaron los estragos realizados por el ciclón que dejó más de ocho muertos. El gobernador Ricardo Rosselló advirtió que podría tomar meses restaurar la electricidad en toda la isla.
Joven de Chicago está haciendo la diferencia en poblaciones de Morelos afectadas por el sismo
Una campaña creada por una joven estudiante de enfermería de Chicago se ha multiplicado a tal grado que ha llegado a poblaciones mexicanas donde la ayuda para los damnificados por el terremoto se está tardando en llegar.
"Las autoridades no nos informan bien": la zozobra que invade las operaciones de rescate en México
El tiempo empieza a jugar en contra de quienes aún mantienen las esperanzas de encontrar con vida a sus familiares que quedaron atrapados en los escombros tras el terremoto y a esa angustia se suma la frustración de recibir información contradictoria. La desesperación de no saber nada es "lo que más nos mata", insisten.
Scocco mete a River a las semifinales de CL con cinco goles y manda "fuerza" a México
El delantero ayudó a la goleada de 8-0 sobre el Jorge Wilstermann boliviano y el conjunto argentino jugará ante el ganador de Lanús y San Lorenzo.
Pável Pardo y los refuerzos extranjeros: “Los dueños de los equipos no hacen bien su trabajo”
Nuestro experto aseguró que en muchas ocasiones los equipos terminan perdiendo dinero con jugadores que llegan y no funcionan, y en gran parte es por no hacer una buena investigación antes de traerlos.
Los analistas de Univisión Deportes coinciden: El mundo deportivo siempre debe solidarizarse ante la tragedia
Para nuestros comentaristas, el deporte juega un papel fundamental como catalizador ante el dolor, pero sobre todo, por su nivel de convocatoria, estructura y economía para ayudar a los necesitados.
Mira cada uno de los touchdowns de la Semana 2 | NFL Highlights 2017
Vuelve a vibrar con todas las anotaciones que se hicieron en la segunda semana en la NFL.