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The farm laborers of Immokalee that Irma left homeless and jobless
About 75% of Immokalee's population is Latino; agricultural workers earning an average of $1,400 per month, while the most affordable housing costs $1,500 for a mobile home in poor condition. So, each trailer is usually shared by two families, or more. After the passage of Irma, many of these homes were left uninhabitable, but for their undocumented tenants there are no other options.
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This big thinker has a plan to power Puerto Rico with the sun
Some 3.4 million Puerto Ricans lost power after Hurricane Maria, and restoring it has been the island’s toughest challenge during rebuilding. But Alexis Massol, a civil engineer who won the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize, is hoping to use the power of the sun to get the lights back on.
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This Dominican family struggles to get by after Hurricane Maria
Hurricane Maria didn’t spare anyone on the island of Dominica--even prime minister Roosevelt Skerrit lost his roof during the storm. Weeks later, the entire island remained in a fragile state. Here, one family describes their day-to-day life since the hurricane. Andel Challenger, 46, clears trees and electricity lines blocking the road near his family’s home. Since a category 5 hurricane hit the island on September 18, they have struggled to find water and food. "There are no emergency services here," he says. The father of the Challenger family, Hutson, a pastor at an evangelical church, designed the family’s house in the 80s to resist hurricanes. One of the only concrete structures in the Kalinago indigenous area, it’s also one of the only homes there that survived the powerful storm. The house became a refuge for his mother-in-law, two children, daughter-in-law and four grandchildren, who all lost their homes due to the hurricane. Across the island, 85% of homes were damaged.
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“This is going to be a rich man's playground”: How climate change may accelerate gentrification in Miami
During Hurricane Maria, well-known Puerto Rican percussionist Tito Matos lost the building where he gave weekly children’s workshops on ‘plena,’ a type of Puerto Rican folkloric music. But that didn’t stop him from continuing to share the folklore. On October 4 he took his instruments to the Plaza del Indio in San Juan to play. In the midst of stress over long lines, no electricity or water, and damage from Hurricane Maria, Matos summoned both adults and children to enjoy the music of their ancestors.
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From retirement paradise to disaster zone: the uncertain future of a trailer park in the Keys
Half of the more than 100 families that lived in the same trailer park as Yolanda, in Islamorada, have already left the island. Months after Irma damaged one of every five homes in the Florida Keys, the prospect for those who insist on staying in modest low-income housing is still bleak. Yolanda lost the mobile home she bought with her savings. Without compensation from FEMA, she cannot afford to enjoy her retirement because she doesn’t have enough money for repairs and reconstruction.
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Karen’s boat was destroyed by Irma and she says she has never felt so lost in her life
Karen Carter is a resident of Ramrod Key and has not yet recovered from the impact of the devastation on her island. Average rent is around $2,500, which is why she chose to live in a boat that was lost in Hurricane Irma. Nor is there, she claims, a firm commitment by the government to assist the disaster victims. Karen has no idea where to begin to rebuild her life.
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This Puerto Rican coffee producer keeps going despite a blow from María
The passage of the most powerful cyclone to hit the Caribbean island reduced Roberto Atienza's coffee harvest to a sorry 15%. "This year’s will be the worst ever," he says after remembering that it’s been five years since the last good harvest. Resigned to starting over, he reckons that the Hacienda San Pedro will take at least 10 years to return to normal. But the hurricane also left something positive: "I have never seen so many people so willing to help others," he says, adding that the lesson will help them to begin to value the things that are truly necessary.
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360 video: Barbuda after the storm
“This storm was like a monster,” says Arthur Nibbs, a politician from Antigua and Barbuda, remembering the storm that destroyed 75% of his island’s structures, including schools, hospitals and police stations.
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Christiane Amanpour's speech on sexual harassment, with Charlie Rose in the audience
On November 15, days before the allegations of sexual harassment against Charlie Rose came to light, the CNN International host issued a public call to editors and executives to end the abuse and sexual harassment in the media. That evening, Rose, who is being replaced by Amanpour on an interim basis, was sitting only a few feet away as she spoke.
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Private Armies: A Colombian mercenary in the Persian Gulf opens up about this secretive business
The Colombian soldier Mauricio Calvo shares his experience as part of a burgeoning industry of men who travel the world to fight in other people's wars.
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How to get through to white supremacists
Angela King went from being a Neonazi skinhead to working to lure people out of hate groups. Today, King says she’s worried about what she sees as an increase of hate and a U.S. president who refuses to publicly denounce it. She has a unique insight into the most effective ways to respond to incidences of hate and extremism, and why people are in the life in the first place.
7 minutes: how long it takes to load 300 kilos of cocaine on a small plane in the Peruvian jungle
A video obtained by Univision Investiga, shows step by step a drug trafficking operation from the moment a small plane lands on a clandestine dirt landing strip until it takes off with the cargo seven minutes later, on a round-trip to and from Bolivia.
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"He sprayed the kids with bullets like an animal": Survivor describes Texas church massacre
Through tears, Joaquín Ramírez recalls the minutes after a gunman entered a Baptist church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, and fired at everyone in his path.
Bilingualism offers cognitive and academic benefits.
Becoming Bilingual in Spanish and English: Why Is It Important? What Can Parents Do?
There are many things that parents can do to value the Spanish language that they speak and develop their children’s interest in speaking, reading, and learning Spanish.
Miedo en la capital del pollo de Estados Unidos
Univision News visited Gainesville, Georgia, the city with the highest concentration of undocumented immigrants in the country. It is one of the few counties where local law enforcement has free rein to act as immigration police. This report is the first in a series called Immigration Lab.