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103.1-song-list: Últimas noticias para 103.1-song-list. | Univision

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  • Who says music for kids can’t be cool? My personal kid-friendly playlist
    Who says music for kids can’t be cool? My personal kid-friendly playlist

    Who says music for kids can’t be cool? My personal kid-friendly playlist

    Okay, I might need to add a disclaimer to that title. I am fairly certain all of these songs are kid-friendly. I personally don’t know about any hidden, and potentially inappropriate meanings for any of them, but one never knows. It is not lost on me that this list is missing some seriously great rap and hip hop songs but until they offer more kid-friendly versions we are going to have to let the kids discover those songs when they get a little older. So, having said that, here is some music for kids that will get them rockin’ and ensure they grow up listening to the good stuff, according to me, that is. The Beatles, All You Need is Love Why not start their introduction to good music with a band that few would argue didn’t change the world? Just like a good book, the Beatles are band the kids will devour. Neil Young, Rockin’ in the Free World With good music comes good musicianship? musiciandry? Musicality? Are any of those words? Anyway, kids these days should know that music doesn’t always come from a computer. There are some great artists out there. Coldplay, Clocks It’s just a genius song. Who doesn’t love this band? Music for kids needs to be made up of great bands with supreme talent and Coldplay tops the list every time. Taylor Swift, Shake it Off Maybe she stands out a little on this list, but the kids lover her and for good reason. This artist is writing her own songs and staying out of trouble. You love her, too. Stop pretending. Elton John, Rocket Man I wanted to add Tiny Dancer so you could teach your children the wrong lyrics and laugh when they sang, ‘Hold me closer Tony Danza but in the interest of keeping this legitimate, I had to add a song I always turn to when my girls want to have a dance party. Pink, Just Give Me a Reason She’s super talented and a total rock star. Women can rock, too, and our kids need to know it. Feel free to throw in a little Joan Jett if you need to drive this point home. Prince, Purple Rain He’s the artist that other artists adore. There is no other like him. Kids can get behind his eclectic style and they can appreciate how he rocks that guitar. Bruno Mars, Uptown Funk It’s okay to be current with a few of your choices. This catchy tune will have everyone up and dancing. The Rolling Stones, You Can’t Always Get What You Want This is a great song, and an even better message for our kids. I like to sing this acapella whenever the kids ask to visit the toy store. John Lennon, Imagine Why not end our playlist with a great song that inspires? There you have it. A list of great songs to listen to with your kids. I’d love to know what would be on your playlist.
  • Making Your Kid’s Dreams a Reality: How I Taught My Child the Art of Goal Achievement
    Making Your Kid’s Dreams a Reality: How I Taught My Child the Art of Goal Achievement

    Making Your Kid’s Dreams a Reality: How I Taught My Child the Art of Goal Achievement

    Every parent wants to help make their kid’s dreams become reality. I know I do! The good news is it’s very possible. How? By teaching children to set goals and work to achieve them. Doing this also encourages perseverance by helping kids learn that even if they fail at first, they have the power to get back up and try again. Here are the 4 basic steps to successful goal setting and achievement to get you and your child started… 1. Set the goal Have your child write down the things he or she would like to accomplish this week, this month, or by the end of this year. If your child needs some help coming up with ideas, recall the times he’s said, “I wish I could…” and decide together of ways to transform that wish into a specific goal. Make certain the goal is specific and includes a deadline so you’re both clear about when it has been achieved and when to celebrate success. Not “I want to learn how to play a song on the piano,” but “I will learn how to play Mary Had A Little Lamb by Monday, August 10th.” Here’s a free Goal Achievement Chart to help organize action steps and monitor progress! 2. Create a plan Once you have decided on a goal, break it down into smaller pieces. Using the example goal set in #1, the action steps may look like: Learn to play the first line of the music by Monday, July 6th. Practice the section 5 times without mistake each day. Learn to play the second line by Monday, July 13th. Practice the section 5 times without mistake each day. Learn to play the third line by Monday, July 20th. Practice the section 5 times without mistake each day. Learn to play the third line by Monday, July 27th. Practice the section 5 times without mistake each day. Learn to play the final fifth line by Monday, August 3rd. Practice the section 5 times without mistake each day. Have the song perfected by Monday August 10th. Practice whole song 5 times without mistake each day. 3. Record your progress and offer incentives to keep the momentum going Each action step that has been successfully completed should be recorded so your child can monitor her progress. Charts are excellent for creating a visual reminder of the steps completed and the steps that still needs to be taken to reach the final goal. Stickers on a chart are a great way to acknowledge and celebrate small milestones and keep the excitement going! Here’s a free Weekly Goals Chart to help monitor progress! 4. Reward achievement and praise specific efforts Decide on a great way to celebrate your child’s success! Whether it’s a fun afternoon at the park, an extra hour of video games, a toy your child has had their eye on… just be certain it is something you can and are willing to deliver because your child’s determination and hard work deserves a celebration! Also, keep in mind that while celebrating your child’s achievement is wonderful, it’s just as important to praise her for specific efforts such as practicing daily without fail or studying diligently all semester. This will help your child understand that growth and improvemet is just as important as the final win! That’s it! These are the same 4 steps I followed with my very own son. I wish you the best, and here’s to making your kid’s dreams a reality!
  • 10 Activities to Make Family Video Calls Fun for Kids
    10 Activities to Make Family Video Calls Fun for Kids

    10 Activities to Make Family Video Calls Fun for Kids

    Whether you’re away from your children due to business travel, a trip out of town, or maybe you’re a long-distance relative… technology now enables you to communicate and spend some time with the kids like they’re in the same room! But instead of simply looking into the camera and chatting as usual, give these activities a try and make video calls fun for both you and the kids! Popular video call software: Skype– It can easily be installed to a computer with a webcam, as well as on your mobile phone. It’s free to download and free to use! Facetime – If callers on both ends have an iPhone, iPad or Mac, this is the quickest and easiest way to connect. Google Hangouts– Video chat by PC or your mobile phone. Plus, there are apps you can use to do fun stuff together like draw and play games! Fun activity ideas: 1. Read books together Caribu– This app turns video calls into story time! Both readers are visible on the screen while reading. Available on iPhone and iPad Kindoma Storytime – Another iPhone/iPad app to read with your kids over video chat. Story Before Bed– This is a Google Hangouts app that allows you to record a video of yourself reading a children’s book to be played back any time. Wanna read to the kids in real-time? You can do that too… and it’s free! 2. Draw together Scoot and Doodle – Have a face-to-face session of drawing and designing! Available for Google Hangouts.   3. Take a field trip This is not an app, but an actual outdoor activity! Head out to the zoo, park, or museum and take the kids “with” you! They’ll get a kick out of this virtual field trip!   4. Guessing game Take turns showing a small portion of a toy, household item, snack, tools, flowers, etc. over the camera and ask the other person to guess what it is.   5. Find the alphabets One person picks a letter from the alphabet and the other searches the home for an item that begins with that letter. Don’t forget to set the time limit, or you may not hear back from the child for hours! When the item has been found, you must show it over the camera and say the letter. Points are earned for correct items found and proper pronunciation.   6. Guess the drawing games What am I thinking? – Describe an item to the child (such as a cookie, puppy, flower, etc.) to see if they can draw it strictly from visualization! What am I drawing? – Focus the camera on a blank piece of paper. Begin drawing an object, piece by piece, while the other person tries to guess what it might be.   7. Jokes and riddles Take turns sharing silly jokes and riddles. Don’t know any? Search online! You’ll discover an endless supply of giggle material right at your fingertips!   8. Sing karaoke Turn up the music and sing together! If you don’t have children’s songs or don’t know any lyrics to them, don’t worry! Simply search on YouTube for karaoke versions of your child’s favorite songs that includes lyrics!   9. Dance party Set the phone down, turn up the music, focus the camera on you, and dance with your little love bugs!   10. Staring contest Remember this game? Both players begin by closing their eyes, and at the count of three, open both eyes and stare into the screen. Whoever blinks first loses! These are just some quick ideas for video call fun time with the kids! Do you have a favorite video call game that you enjoy with your children? Looking for more options? Search the web!
  • Fun Activities to Keep Your Kids Busy Through Winter
    Fun Activities to Keep Your Kids Busy Through Winter

    Fun Activities to Keep Your Kids Busy Through Winter

    The snow is falling. The temperatures are plummenting. The kids are bored. What are you going to do to survive the long winter months? When my kids were younger, the days seemed to stretch out forever. The summer months flew by, but the winter months dragged at a slow pace. To keep my kids from bouncing off the walls–or destructively bouncing things off the walls–I lined up a variety of fun winter activities to keep them busy. Here are a few which saved my sanity and kept them busy, as well as a few new ones I wish I had known about when they were growing up. Oh heck, even with teenagers, these activities are still fun! Rock painting As a youngster, I loved to collect rocks. During the Pet Rock era, my folks were too cheap to buy me one, so I had to make do with an ordinary rock from outside. So I painted myself a brand new pet and made a house out of a shoebox, complete with a kitchen, dining room, and bedroom. So yes, you can revive the Pet Rock concept with your kids (my neighbor actually paints animal masterpieces on rocks), or you can simply have fun painting rocks in a variety of ways. Even a toddler can have some messy fun with fingerpaints and flat rocks. Paint them a variety of colors, put them in a clear jar, and voila–you have a colorful centerpiece to display in your kitchen window. Challenge your child to paint something simple on a flat rock–perhaps a flower, a sun, or a car. You can get ready for the spring and decorate a large garden rock with a colorful splash of paint from your child. If you find a sizeable flat rock bigger than your child’s hand, capture their handprint on a rock and seal the rock using a clear acrylic spray. Weekend camping in the house You’re cooped up with the kids and can’t get outside–time to have some camping fun! Build a tent under the dining room table or set up a pop-up tent. Put sleeping bags inside or simply use your child’s bed covers. Fill a pail with small rocks or dried beans (make sure this is with a child older than three) and stick a flashlight in the pail. Tell “fireside” stories or sing songs with your kids before lights out. If you have a fireplace, this is a great time to break out the s’mores. You can even roast dinner in the fireplace. Hunt for Dinner…Or Dessert It’s two hours before dinner and the kids are whining. They’re tired. Cranky. Restless. What are you going to do? It’s time to go hunting! This activity takes some preparation either the day before or hours before. Gather the ingredients to make dinner or dessert. Be sure to package the ingredients safely. If your recipe calls for eggs, be sure to place an egg in a clear plastic carton so that if it breaks–no harm done. Hide the ingredients either in one room, or all around the house. When it’s time for the activity, show your child a picture of the finished dinner or dessert. For example, if you’re making brownies from scratch, show a pan of brownies. You can vary this activity by age and degree of difficulty. For a younger child, you can prepare flash cards with pictures of each ingredient. For an older child, you can tell them the total number of ingredients to look for. Then let them loose! Once all the ingredients are gathered, you can prepare dinner or dessert together. Snow Painting and Balloon Balls For both of these activities, you’re going to want to dress your child in old clothes with old gloves. Food coloring is not easy to remove from clothing! For Snow Painting, you’ll need empty plastic bottles (you can find these in the Dollar store) or simply save and rinse ketchup and mustard bottles. Fill the bottles with water and a few drops of food coloring. Go outside after a fresh snowfall and squirt the liquid on the snow. Make colorful patterns or objects. When you are done, go to a second floor window and take a picture of your creations. For Balloon Balls, fill a ballon with water and add several drops of food coloring. Be sure to leave some room for expansion. Tie the balloon shut and place in freezer. Place a hula hoop upright in the snow and have fun throwing the balls in the hoop. You can also leave the balls outside as a colorful winter decoration. If you’ve run out of ideas, you can always pick up on of the 100 Winter Activities list and try something new. Keep a list of winter activities in a jar and let your kids pick one from the jar. Of course, you can always ask your kids for their winter activities ideas as well!
  • Teach Your Baby to Communicate Using Sign Language
    Teach Your Baby to Communicate Using Sign Language

    Teach Your Baby to Communicate Using Sign Language

    When all three of my kids were infants, my husband and I introduced sign language to them. It was always so much fun watching their pudgy hands form their first signs with big grins on their faces. I found that communicating in sign language helped cut down on tantrums and facilitated my kids’ language development. With simple signs, they were able to tell me when they were hungry, tired, or needed a diaper change. Infants have the ability to communicate manually long before they biologically have the ability to speak. You can introduce sign language at any time. Some babies begin to mimic signs as young as six months old, with the average infant picking up signs by eight months. Children will naturally switch over to speech once they are developmentally able to do so. Make a list of common words that you use with your infant/toddler throughout the day. A great site to look up signs for words is Lifeprint. Start by teaching yourself some basic signs such as “more,” “eat,” and “play.” You can also learn along with your baby by watching videos. Baby Einstein, My First Signs and Signing Time have colorful, attractive videos which are appropriate for infants and toddlers. The most common sign to teach is “more.” When my kids started solid foods, I used this sign often. I would pause after feeding a spoonful and sign, “more” with a questioning look on my face. My infants quickly figured out if they rewarded Mommy with a sign, she would smile and feed them more good stuff. Warning: this may not work with pureed peas as well as it does with applesauce or sweet potatoes. Wrap up the feeding session by teaching “all done” or “full.” Want to raise a polite, thoughtful kid? The magic words, “please” and “thank you” are easy ones for toddlers to sign. You can impress Grandma easily with these signs. Just as babies first words often contain funny pronunciations, babies first signs are often modified as well. For example, when my kids first learned to tell me they were hungry, they signed the “hungry” sign with an open, flat palm going down on their chest instead of signing it properly like this: The sign for “hungry.” The trick is to recognize the modified signs and reward your baby for communicating, then continue to communicate with the proper sign. As your baby’s coordination develops, the signs will become more refined and accurate. From an early age, my kids were able to identify and communicate colors before they were able to talk. I discovered the easy way to teach colors at bath time when I presented my oldest son with a choice between red and blue popsicles as a special treat. He was around ten months old and he confidently let me know that he wanted the cherry-flavored sugar stick by signing “red” back to me. At first, I thought it was a fluke, but he continued to point to red objects and toys after that. Presenting two signs at once and asking your toddler to chose between the two choices is a great way to encourage your child to sign back and build up their language. Signing songs was another way for us to bond and build language at the same time. I especially loved signing Jim Gill’s “I Took a Bath in a Washing Machine” song–it was easy for my kids to sign along. One of the wonderful advantages of sign language is that you can use it anywhere to communicate. When my kids were at the park, I would ask them if they had to use the bathroom and they could communicate their needs back to me. This was great during the potty-training stage! To this day, my ultimate favorite sign is the American Sign Language sign for “I love you.” It is made with the thumb, forefinger, and pinky finger extended, and the two middle fingers folded down. Even at a distance, this distinctive sign sends waves of love to whoever receives it.
  • 22 Books to Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month
    22 Books to Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

    22 Books to Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

    September 15th through October 15th is National Hispanic Heritage Month. The dates are symbolic as within the 30 day period, several Latin American countries celebrate the anniversary of their independence. Latinos make up 17% of the United States total population. However with millions of Latinos spread across the country, there is a lack of Latino authors and books for children. How can we expect children to celebrate their culture and heritage if they can’t identify it within the books they read? Monica Olivera Hazelton (MommyMaestra.com and co-founder of Latinas for Latino Literature) addressed the importance of Latino representation in books: “Latino children especially need to be actively taught about their heritage. A study by researchers at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, shows that Latino kids who grow up knowledgeable about their culture – and proud of it – are more likely to excel in school, have a strong self-esteem, and develop healthy behaviors. The study reveals that these children develop fewer social problems, and experience less hopelessness, aggression, and substance abuse.” Hispanic Heritage Month is a perfect time to introduce Latino literature and history to children. Here are 22 Books to Teach Children about Latino Culture and Heritage Picture/Children’s Books On This Beautiful Island Written and illustrated by Edwin Fontanez Arroz con Leche: Popular Songs and Rhymes from Latin America Selected and Illustrated by Lulu Delecre Yes! We Are Latinos by Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy and illustrated by David Diaz A Kid´s Guide to Latino History by Valerie Petrillo My Diary From Here to There/Mi diario de aqui hasta alla by Amada Irma Perez and illustrated by Maya Christina Gonzalez My Name is Celia/Me llamo Celia: The Life of Celia Cruz/la vida de Celia Cruz by Monica Brown and illustrated by Rafael Lopez Sonia Sotomayor: A Judge Grows in the Bronx / La juez que crecio en el Bronx (Spanish and English Edition) by Jonah Winter illustrated by Edel Rodriguez The Storyteller’s Candle / La Velita De Los Cuentos by Lucia Gonzalez and illustrated by Lulu Delecre Biblioburro: A True Story from Colombia written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter Side by Side/Lado a Lado: The Story of Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez by Monica Brown and illustrated by Joe Cepeda Dona Flor by Pat Mora and illustrated by Raul Colon Books for Young Adults An Island Like You by Judith Ortiz Cofer When I Was Puerto Rican by Esmeralda Santiago The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfu Anaya Mexican WhiteBoy by Matt De La Pena The Girl Who Could Silence The Wind by Meg Medina Down These Mean Streets by Piri Thomas Latino Americans: The 500 Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation by Ray Suarez Growing Up Latino: Memoirs and Stories edited by Harold Augenbraum, Ilan Stavans Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America by Juan Gonzalez
  • A Serious Look at April Fools’ Jokes
    A Serious Look at April Fools’ Jokes

    A Serious Look at April Fools’ Jokes

    For a few years my daughter’s “favorite holiday” was not the one with all those lights and presents or the one with colored eggs and all the chocolate she could eat. No, instead she loved the day dedicated to making others laugh, the first of April. However rather than tricky pranks, she instead went for “April Fools” Jokes. There is a difference and it’s an important one. My daughter was scared of the dark for a long time. One night, while walking upstairs with her before bed, I reached my arm into her bedroom to turn on the lights. Thinking I’d have a little fun with her, I acted as if when I put my arm into the darkness something grabbed it and yanked me into her room. She screamed, but in the moment she decided whatever my fate was in the darkness, she would share it. She came into the room and when she realized it was all a set-up, she cried from relief and anger at my deception. While they may be funny, “pranks”—like Jimmy Kimmel’s yearly prank where parents tell kids they’ve eaten all of their Halloween candy—are often tied to betrayal and fear. The humor inherent in these kinds of pranks is based on the relief that some kind of trauma didn’t actually happen. It fosters distrust and can make actual emotional trauma more painful, because the “punchline”—that this was all a gag—isn’t there. Interestingly, it was my daughter’s own sense of humor that helped me see this distinction. Her April Fools’ Jokes were either subtle or silly, but the “butt” joke was always her. Some were simple, such as wearing odd outfits or claiming to have a new, odd passion. One year she “went country” and asserted that she would only listen to the twangiest country music around. Of the musical genres I enjoy, this particular brad of country music is at the bottom of the list. However, the joke worked because with my daugther’s ever-evolving tastes, the change was possible, however unlikely. Of course, it all boils down to your family’s sense of humor. Most of my April Fools’ Jokes are surprisingly uncreative, boiling down to a ridiculous song, dance, or outfit. Yet, these old standbys make my daughter laugh every time. The trick for selecting your own April Fools’ Jokes is to ask yourself two questions: Is this something my kids will find funny and does the joke rely on “disappointment” for its punch? If the answer to the second question is “yes,” it doesn’t mean the joke has to be discounted. For example, this year I plan to disconnect all of the cable boxes and declare the household “television free.” If she believes me, that’ll be great. However, she’ll know I’m kidding. The “fun” will come with playing along with gag. What are some of your favorite April Fools’ jokes you’ve pulled on your kids? That they’ve pulled on you? Tell us below!
  • The Ten Best Children’s Books You Need in Your Home
    The Ten Best Children’s Books You Need in Your Home

    The Ten Best Children’s Books You Need in Your Home

    When it comes to children’s books there are many to choose from. Take it from an experienced educator, not all children’s books are created equal. You deserve to enjoy the books you read each night as much as your children do. If you’re looking for a list of the best children’s books around choose any of these titles and you won’t be dissapointed. 10. The Day The Crayons Quit: Written by Drew Daywal and Illustrated by Oliver Jeffers This might be the cleverest book in recent years. When little Duncan decides to color he finds his crayon box is full of notes from his hard-done-by crayons. Orange and yellow are battling to be named the official color of the sun and Pink is desperate for Duncan to include her. The witty letters to Duncan will have you and your child laughing and relating to the plight of the crayons. This book is sure to become a classic. 9. How to Catch a Star: Written by Oliver Jeffers and Illustrated by Oliver Jeffers Writer and Illustrator Oliver Jeffers (who also illustrated The Day The Crayons Quit) might be the best thing to happen to children’s books in decades. His stories are simply beautiful and his illustrations are worthy of hanging in your home. This uber-talented man is even cheeky enough to use a childhood picture as his author photo. Once you read one of his books you’ll become a collector for sure. 8. Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site: Written by Sherri Duskey Rinker and Illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld You’ll love the stellar illustrations and sweet rhymes of this book. Bulldozer and his construction site friends settle into sleep for the night so they can be ready to work hard in the morning. Children love to read about their favorite machines having a bedtime routine just like them. This one will be an instant hit with your kids. 7. Ish: Written and Illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds Sometimes children are afraid to make mistakes and Ish teaches a lesson that is not always so easy to convey. Ramom’s careless drawing mistake is viewed by his little sister as something beyond a scribble and together we learn that ‘just right’ isn’t as important To Marisol as it is to Ramon. Ish encourages the pursuit of creativity and not perfection and it’s a lesson even the grownups could use. 6. I Do Not Eat The Color Green: Written by Lynn Rickards and Illustrated by Margaret Chamberlain Got a picky-eater? Let them relate to Marlene McKean who refuses to eat the color green. Children will love to finish the rhymes on each page for you as you read through the brightly illustrated pages. 5. Matilda: Written by Roald Dahl A classic for good reason, Roald Dahl’s Matilda is a must for every home. This chapter book offers the story of a remarkable little girl who succeeds despite her horrible parents and even worse school principal. Your whole family will be rooting for Matilda and wishing for bedtime to continue the story. This is easily one of the best children’s books of all time. 4. Pete the Cat: I Love My White Shoes: Written by Eric Litwin and Illustrated by James Dean Pete is so smooth. Pete has rythm. Pete is one cool cat. Let the antics of this sly kitty entertain your little ones as you get into the songs he sings and the friends he meets. You’ll be hard-pressed to find a child who has yet to hear of Pete the Cat. 3. The Giving Tree: Written and Illustrated by Shel Silverstein This one will make you cry. I offer you fair warning because even though you’ll weep for the message Silverstein shares you’ll want to read this book over and over again. Silverstein is the ultimate wordsmith and his name should be well known to your family. 2. The Dark: Written by Lemony Snicket and Illustrated by Jon Klassen The title is enough to draw you in. The ominous ‘dark’. Laszlo will defeat his fear of the dark and show children it can be done in this beautifully illustrated book by the great Lemony Snicket. You’ll wish you had this when you were a kid. 1. Santiago the Dreamer: Written by Ricky Martin and Illustrated by Patricia Castelao Tackling the tough stuff like self-doubt and fear of following your dreams, Santiago the Dreamer tells the story of a boy who finds his confidence with encouragement from his loving father and realizes anything is possible. Read this when you want to build you children up because the heartfelt message is as true today as it ever was and our kids need to know it.