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103.1-playlist: Últimas noticias para 103.1-playlist. | Univision

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  • Respuesta Sensorial Meridiana Autónoma, una técnica que promete relajar a las personas a través de los susurros
    Respuesta Sensorial Meridiana Autónoma, una técnica que promete relajar a las personas a través de los susurros

    Respuesta Sensorial Meridiana Autónoma, una técnica que promete relajar a las personas a través de los susurros

    Una de las expertas en el tema es Jonie, quien tiene un canal en YouTube llamado 'Murmullo latino' y por medio del cual busca generar una sensación de cercanía con el usuario, hacerlos sentir especiales, atendidos, consentidos y así aliviar la ansiedad, la depresión y hasta el estrés. Varios de sus suscriptores aseguran que les cambió la vida al conocer este arte y ahora hace parte de su diario vivir.
  • Doña Flor y Sus Dos Maridos Capítulo 7
    Doña Flor y Sus Dos Maridos Capítulo 7

    Doña Flor y Sus Dos Maridos Capítulo 7

    Teo termina su relación con Rosalía. Las mujeres del pueblo esparcen el rumor de que Flor está embarazada. Margarita no permite que Flor viva en la casa de su papá. Alguien le roba la ropa a Flor y Valentín y se quedan desnudos en la playa.
  • 100 días en 100 fotos: El comienzo de la era Trump
    100 días en 100 fotos: El comienzo de la era Trump

    100 días en 100 fotos: El comienzo de la era Trump

    El conteo de estos días clave en la gestión de gobierno, son una vieja tradición en Estados Unidos. Estas imágenes reflejan la información más relevante de cada jornada transcurrida desde la toma de posesión hasta hoy, publicada en Univision Noticias.
    David Maris
  • En fotos: Así transcurrieron los primeros 100 días de Donald Trump en la Casa Blanca
    En fotos: Así transcurrieron los primeros 100 días de Donald Trump en la Casa Blanca

    En fotos: Así transcurrieron los primeros 100 días de Donald Trump en la Casa Blanca

    Los tres meses iniciales de todo nuevo gobierno son seguidos con gran atención por los medios y los ciudadanos. Esta serie de fotografías incluyó cada día una nueva imagen que ilustró los eventos principales en el arranque de la gestión de Trump.
    David Maris
  • Who says music for kids can’t be cool? My personal kid-friendly playlist
    Who says music for kids can’t be cool? My personal kid-friendly playlist

    Who says music for kids can’t be cool? My personal kid-friendly playlist

    Okay, I might need to add a disclaimer to that title. I am fairly certain all of these songs are kid-friendly. I personally don’t know about any hidden, and potentially inappropriate meanings for any of them, but one never knows. It is not lost on me that this list is missing some seriously great rap and hip hop songs but until they offer more kid-friendly versions we are going to have to let the kids discover those songs when they get a little older. So, having said that, here is some music for kids that will get them rockin’ and ensure they grow up listening to the good stuff, according to me, that is. The Beatles, All You Need is Love Why not start their introduction to good music with a band that few would argue didn’t change the world? Just like a good book, the Beatles are band the kids will devour. Neil Young, Rockin’ in the Free World With good music comes good musicianship? musiciandry? Musicality? Are any of those words? Anyway, kids these days should know that music doesn’t always come from a computer. There are some great artists out there. Coldplay, Clocks It’s just a genius song. Who doesn’t love this band? Music for kids needs to be made up of great bands with supreme talent and Coldplay tops the list every time. Taylor Swift, Shake it Off Maybe she stands out a little on this list, but the kids lover her and for good reason. This artist is writing her own songs and staying out of trouble. You love her, too. Stop pretending. Elton John, Rocket Man I wanted to add Tiny Dancer so you could teach your children the wrong lyrics and laugh when they sang, ‘Hold me closer Tony Danza but in the interest of keeping this legitimate, I had to add a song I always turn to when my girls want to have a dance party. Pink, Just Give Me a Reason She’s super talented and a total rock star. Women can rock, too, and our kids need to know it. Feel free to throw in a little Joan Jett if you need to drive this point home. Prince, Purple Rain He’s the artist that other artists adore. There is no other like him. Kids can get behind his eclectic style and they can appreciate how he rocks that guitar. Bruno Mars, Uptown Funk It’s okay to be current with a few of your choices. This catchy tune will have everyone up and dancing. The Rolling Stones, You Can’t Always Get What You Want This is a great song, and an even better message for our kids. I like to sing this acapella whenever the kids ask to visit the toy store. John Lennon, Imagine Why not end our playlist with a great song that inspires? There you have it. A list of great songs to listen to with your kids. I’d love to know what would be on your playlist.
  • Taylor Swift dice adiós a Spotify
    Taylor Swift dice adiós a Spotify

    Taylor Swift dice adiós a Spotify

    Taylor Swift decidió de manera inesperada retirar su discografía completa de la plataforma de streaming Spotify.
    Univision.com
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    Spotify dice cuales son las mejores canciones para tener sexo

    Un estudio del servicio de música demostró cuales son las canciones más escogidas a la hora de estar con alguien.
    Univision.com
  • Breaking Borders: Exposing our Daughter to Indigenous Peoples and a Multicultural World
    Breaking Borders: Exposing our Daughter to Indigenous Peoples and a Multicultural World

    Breaking Borders: Exposing our Daughter to Indigenous Peoples and a Multicultural World

    I had been hearing about the importance of routines since before my daughter was born. Between the back and forth to music, art, or gym class, set mealtimes, and set bedtimes, I began to feel like my daughter’s world was quite small. How could I teach her about other countries, cultures, and indigenous peoples across the globe within the confines of our day to day life? While I would love to have the time and funds to jet set off to a foreign land with my family, that’s not currently in the cards. Plus, it would be nice to have my daughter be of an age where she’d remember such a journey. My husband and I decided that the best way we could introduce her to other cultures at this stage is exposure through things she enjoys every day: reading books, listening to music, and going to museums. There are a number of multicultural children’s books available – all intended to transcend stereotypes and expose the reader to other cultures. “Round is a Mooncake” by Roseanne Thong has become a favorite in our house. Thong includes recognizable items (the moon, a pebble, a cell phone) as well as items relevant to Chinese culture. As a bonus, there’s a glossary that defines the Chinese items mentioned in the book which allows me to further the conversation after we’re done reading. I sing and listen to music all day long with my daughter, so incorporating songs from other parts of the world has become a fun way to expose her to other cultures. We’ve added Native American, Latin, African, Irish, and Indian music to our Pandora playlist. We try to tie this music to meals or events, so, for example, we’ll talk about Irish step dancing around St. Patrick’s Day or we’ll listen to salsa music while eating a Colombian inspired dinner. In these ways, we feel we can bring a bit of other cultures into our home. We may not have plans to travel to overseas right now, but The Boston Children’s Museum’s Japanese house exhibit allows us to step into an actual home from Kyoto, Japan. From taking off our shoes before we enter, to sitting on the mats around the dining table, to observing a Japanese garden, we have a unique opportunity to experience what daily life was like in this hundred year old house. In addition to the Japanese house, there are several other permanent exhibits and scheduled programs that highlight world cultures. These exhibits and events have given our daughter opportunities to experience traditions and cultures with nearly all senses. We know that these are small steps that we can take as parents to introduce other traditions, ceremonies, lifestyles, and languages into our daughter’s life, but our hope is that we spark a natural curiosity to learn more and create an attitude of tolerance and acceptance. In what ways have you exposed your child to our multicultural world and the indigenous peoples in which it resides?
  • Cleaning Games: How We Make Chores Fun
    Cleaning Games: How We Make Chores Fun

    Cleaning Games: How We Make Chores Fun

    My daughter loves the internet, especially playing online games. It started early with her playing educational games from Sesame Street or games where a player can decorate ponies, princesses or monsters. Surprisingly, many of these games, mostly aimed at girls, involve cleaning. Cleaning games that feature a big-eyed avatar cleaning up for a party or picking up after a party or cleaning up their rooms so they can go to a party…you get the point, right? The societal problems of hundreds of games aimed at girls that center on cleaning-as-fun aside, what fascinated me was how monotonous even the cleaning games were. Still, it gave me an idea about how to get kids to pitch-in with household chores. In the past, I had used cleaning as a kind of alternative to time-out which had the unfortunate side effect of associating the task with punishment. So, I had to come up with some real-life cleaning games that, while never making the chore something Madison wants to do, has helped it be somewhat less excruciating. When she was still young, the games could be simple. We would have contests, such as who could pick up the most toys or gather the most dirty laundry in a given time period. The prize would either be simple bribery—a treat or the promise of some activity (like video games) if the task was done to standard—or a schoolyard-dare kind of consequence. The game that seemed to motivate the most effectively, was one where the winner got to draw in washable marker on the other person’s face. Winning or losing was still “fun,” and—by taking some strategic losses—could go on for hours. As she got older, these tricks failed to work as effectively because her tastes changed. While she still might get a kick out of drawing a butt on my forehead (butt-head, get it?), the game didn’t motivate like before. Now, we’ll hold “dance parties” wherein we play music while we clean. As certain benchmarks are reached (e.g. vacuuming is finished), Madison gets control of the music. As long as we are working, she gets to pick the playlist. Another cleaning game, that isn’t so much of a game, is called “Keep it or Throw it Away?” Whenever it is my daughter’s specific stuff that is the source of the mess—such as a giant dollhouse or hundreds of interlocking blocks for toddlers—I imitate a cheesy gameshow host and ask Madison what to do with it. This both empowers her and makes getting rid of sentimentally valuable old toys a little easier. Of course, sometimes all of this fails and I resort to plain, old-fashioned bribery. What ways do you try to make cleaning fun at home?