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Al Punto con Jorge Ramos - 18 de julio, 2021

Protestas históricas en Cuba en contra del gobierno, las personas exigen su libertad y el presidente Biden expone su postura con respecto al conflicto. Abraham Jiménez, periodista independiente, habla de lo que está viviendo el pueblo de Cuba.
19 Jul 2021 – 12:00 AM EDT
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>> lets get to the point, "al punto.">> freedom, freedom. >> in cuba, protests.people are complaining about lack of food, medicine, andfreedom. an independent journalist fromhavana tells us what he has seen.>> we record nice we have to come together to fulfill thefirst responsibility of democracy, to keep each othersafe. >> president biden has a plan toface violence. we talk to the sheriff of losangeles county and the chief of police of miami.donald trump obtained 38% of the latino vote in the lastelection. how did he achieve that?we speak with his campaign chief in florida.we are also joined by lina hidalgo, harris county judge.she tells us what democrats need to do to bring back latinovoters. and we will speak with paperaguilar and his children -- with pepe aguilar and his children.we begin now. ♪>> lets get to the point, "al punto," with jorge ramos.♪ >> thats get to the point, "alpunto." we begin this week in cuba.we are seeing the largest protests against thedictatorship in decades. the pandemic undoubtedlyworsened the economic conditions in the country.there are less medicine and food, but what cubans arecomplaining about is the lack of freedom.there have been calls of "down with the dictatorship,"something unheard of until recently.many people have been arrested. >> the eyes of the worldcouldnt believe what was happening in cuba.july 11, the people took to the streets.it was a historic incident since, in 62 years, nothing likethat had been seen before. the calls were clear.it began as a group of people in san antonio de los hispanossouthwest of havana. fear was set aside.people were watching the police cars.police tried to impose order, but protesters threw rocks andinsulted them. >> we are invoking all --convoke and all revolutionaries to go to the streets where thismay happen. the next day, the police tookaction. special troops trained tocontrol the population, broke into this house.they injured and arrested a father who is accused ofparticipating in the protests. they shot against unarmedcivilians in one of the poorest neighborhoods in havana.>> the united states is firmly with cuba.we ask the government to not use violence to silence it.>> cuban-americans, unhappy with joe bidens reaction, traveledfrom all over the country to ask help from the white house forthe people on the island. and this weekend, raul castrowas present at an event. >> thanks for that report.the state department has said clearly it is not in favor ofmilitary intervention in cuba. senator bob menendez said theexact same thing, that would not happen.biden says he supports the cuban peoples right to protest and befreed of an authoritarian regime.>> the united states stands with the people of cuba as theyassert their rights. we call on the government ofcuba to reframe from violence or attempts to silence the voice ofthe people of cuba. >> that is what president bidensaid regarding cuba. we contacted abraham jimenez, anindependent journalist. recently, in a washington posteditorial, he said cubans are losing their fear.he added cubans cant put up with this regime any more.we spoke with him earlier this week when the cuban governmenttried to restrict access to the internet, but he found a way tospeak with us from his apartment in havana.sometimes the image disappears, but his voice rings loud.thanks for speaking with us. what is happening in yourcountry? >> people are fed up.the people are tired, and they took to the streets.but the situation that is being experienced now in the countryis at its limits. people in cuba cannot takeanymore. there is not enough food, notenough medicine. the health system collapsedbecause of the pandemic. we are living in extremeconditions hour-by-hour. there has also been a lot ofrepression, and that has prompted the country to take tothe streets. these are images we have neverseen before. they speak to the indignity of apeople that have been suffering under this regime for sixdecades. they have said "enough."that jane -- that change the game completely.>> people are asking for a different health and economicsituation or are they asking for a regime change?>> one thing leads to another. to change the situation forpeople regarding medicine and food, there needs to be a changein the regime. basically, what people areasking for is a change in regime.people in the streets were saying down with dictatorship.they were chanting "freedom." that never happened that way atsuch a massive scale that people referred to this government aswhat it is, it dictatorship. >> doesnt that put you at risk?>> i am a journalist, and have been for a while.im always at risk. >> we are losing your signal.>> i am in the basement because the government is cuttinginternet throughout the country, and it started again.i can try doing it from inside. >> no, i do not want to lose thesignal. how are you connecting with us?>> i cannot reveal my strategy, because i would lose access tothat. but i am doing so clandestinely.otherwise, i would tell you. >> understood.when you heard the response asking people to go to thestreets, he reminded me of what fidel castro did in 1994.he asked people to take to the streets to face off againstprotesters. >> we are asking all therevolutionaries in the country, all communists, to go to thestreets wherever these provocations may take place.they have to go over our dead bodies.if they want to face off against the revolution, and we arewilling to do anything. >> do you fear a repressivewave? >> we are living in a repressivewave. people were shot.many people were arrested. many people disappeared.many people were wounded, including children.the response was beyond measure. we need all the governments inlatin america to speak out. it is a call for the world tosee cuba for what it is -- a dictatorship.we need to break that idyllic, utopian idea that draws people,makes people see cuba for what it tried to be but never was.>> do you think this is the beginning of the end for thedictatorship, or is that too much to hope for?>> that is too much to hope for, because this country continuesto be controlled by the military.the people continue to not have arms.even now, i hear sirens. probably another protest.something is happening right now.i am going to go out in a little bit.i was saying that it is probably too much to say it is thebeginning of the end. but it needs to be noted thatthe internet has changed this country.the internet has empowered to bins.and we have made the leap from the virtual space to thestreets. no one knows what might happen.no one knows what might happen. the administration is more andmore aggressive. >> i will end with this -- thebeast has been awakened. do you agree?>> yes, i think so. they have taken so much from usin the last few decades. they have taken so much thatthey have also taken away our fear.people are no longer afraid. what else can they take from youif you do not have a plate of food, if you can die at anymoment because you do not have medicine, if they can, arrestyou at your home for any reason? what else is left?lets go out and face off face to face.>> thank you. i want to let you know that yourvoices being heard in millions of cell phones, laptops, andcomputers around the world. >> thank you.it is always a pleasure. >> when we return, there is anincrease in gun violence in the country.what is the government doing? we speak with two chiefs ofpolice, one in los angeles and one in miami.also, who are the latinos who voted for trump?we will see we recognize that we come together to fulfill thefirst stability -- the first responsibility of democracy.that is to keep each other safe. that is what the american peopleare looking for when it comes to reducing violent crime and gunviolence. >> that is president bidentalking about his administrations strategy toreduce gun violence. that is a growin problem in theunited states. over 25% of 2019 to 2020 was theincrease we saw in gun violence. 2021 could be the most violentyear in two decades. so far, over 10,700 people havebeen shot to death in the united states.that is 55 per day, more than in the last five years.two chiefs of police are with us now.we begin with a los angeles, where homicides, crime, andviolent crimes have increased. alex villanueva is here topropose a solution. sheriff, thank you for beinghere. we want you to explain why crimehas increased so much in the united states.i will focus on the united states.it has increased 25 -- homicides have increased on a 5%.in south los angeles, homicides increased 50%.what is happening? >> that number is actuallysmaller than what is really happening.it has increased 59% 60% almost -- 59% to 60% almost, at leasthomicides. shootings also increased 59%.last year, we saw an increase of 36%.that has doubled, almost, from last year.we are in a very bad place. >> you are talking aboutfirearms. lets see if this is linked tothe sale of firearms this year could exceed the number offirearms sold last year, 21 million.do you think this violence is linked to the purchase offirearms? >> absolutely.the more firearms are circulating among the public, alarge percentage of that will end up in the hands ofcriminals. and people who have theintention to use these firearms. and if the district attorneys donot want there to be consequences for using firearms,that benefits criminals more and more, to have these firearmswhen they are committing robberies, for example.and we are seeing that on the streets day after day.tragedy after tragedy. >> do you think this increase inviolence is somehow also linked to the pandemic?not just because of the restrictions we lived under butbecause economically many families have been affected bythe pandemic, because they have lost work, they have not beenable to pay rent for months because they cannot find work?>> i agree with you. there is a financial reason.when you cannot put food on a table, some people will takeextreme measures to feed their families.that is one group. the other reason is thatpsychological pressure, being locked up, not being able tohave access to recreation or other distractions.also, communal events. all of these opportunities toget away from violence and have other distractions -- we havelost all of that. as a result of that, we see anincrease in violence with firearms, which is what we areseeing. >> what do you think of thisidea in the united states that says we need to take money awayfrom you, money from police departments in the unitedstates, due to the police violence we have seen throughoutthe country? >> it is the same element infavor of criminals, of suspects. what they are trying to say is,with fewer police officers and more criminals on the streets,the city will be safer. and that -- that is alsonarrative. and those elements that havecommitted police abuse have been arrested, like derek chauvin,who killed poor george floyd, and police reform across thecountry is taking into account that it is being reformed.everyone who crosses the line who is a police officer is beingarrested. they are being investigated, andthere is nothing else to do beyond that.most police officers, sheriffs, are not corrupt.they are honest. they are hard workers.they are working for the public good.we need to support these officers.otherwise, we see anarchism, violent crime.we are seeing that in cities like seattle, portland,washington, d.c., chicago. now here in los angeles, we areseeing it as well. there is this push to defundpolice. but in our absence, what willhappen on the streets? criminals, gang members.numbers of criminal organizations.mafias, for example. they will take control of thestreets. we cannot allow that.>> thank you for being here. >> thanks to you.>> now we will jump to the other coast, where there are alsoproblems with an increase in crime.arturo acevedo, chief of police in miami, says that this is apublic health crisis. thank you for being here on theshow. it is a pleasure.>> why is there so much violence in the united states?here is the data i have. 23,000 deaths by firearms justthis year alone. what is happening in the unitedstates? >> to begin with, we have acountry with so many firearms. there are more firearms thanpeople, and we have laws that, to tell the truth, are not beingenforced right now. right now, we have covid, and ithink that has affected mental health a lot.it is a perfect storm. there is a lot of suffering.i think there will be many deaths before this is over.>> let me understand the relationship between violenceand the pandemic. what is that?>> we know many of these homicides have happened amongpeople who know each other. these are not criminals, peoplewith a history of violence. people have a short fuse.they are killing people for no reason.remember that i was recently in houston -- we have a lot ofcourts in this country. there are activist judgesreleasing violent criminals to the streets.one or two weeks later, they are killing people.we need to do a better job controlling firearms, and we allneed to do our part. >> there are few chief of policethat have your experience. you were in austin, now you arein miami. you have heard the criticismsagainst police officers, especially after george floydwas killed. how do you respond to -->> people can be good or bad, just like police officers.but at the end of the day, we have thousands of people whohave died this year, and there will be thousands more.police officers are shot at thousands of times a year.we have to take into account criminals who are fearless.people who only fear prison and death.otherwise, unless we do something, we will see many morefamilies suffering. >> what are your mainchallenges? last month, there was a shootingin miami-dade. i want to say that is not yoursjurisdiction. you were moved from houston tomiami. what did you find?>> i found a city with a lot of support for police.a city that, thank god, -- set a couple things about the courts.-- i said a couple things about the courts, and the judges jointwith us. the judges are ready to do theirpart to maintain justice and safety.i did not see that in houston, because judges there wanted tobe activist judges and protect criminals more than victims, soi am very happy to be in a region where there is supportfor safety, where there is support of the law.>> there is a current in the united states that wants todefund police departments. your reaction?>> remember, it is activist that want to do that.if you go to neighborhoods, to the places where violence ishappening, where crimes are taking place, talk to thosepeople. there was a they do not wantfewer police officers -- they will say they do not want fewerpolice officers. they want to be respected.they want safety. they want better policing, notless. >> suppose you are invited tothe white house and president biden asks for one piece ofadvice to lower violence in the country.what would you suggest to him? >> well, we need -- the courtsare not doing their jobs in this country.there are thousands of cases with suspects who have beencharged with violent crimes, and those cases are not proceeding.we need to have courts running on all eight cylinders, or therewill be more suffering in this country.>> chief arturo acevedo, thank you for being here.>> thank you. >> when we return, new dataemerges regarding latino voters in the 2020 election.donald trump got a lot more votes from latinos than youwould expect. we have also not just one butthree members of the aguilar♪ >> new data gives us a betteridea of what happened in the 2020 elections.the pew center published a sip -- report that showed that trumpgot 6 million votes and joe biden got 10 million votes.in 2020, trump got 38% of the hispanic vote.we are joined by kevin moreno, the head of the trump campaignin florida. how did the trump campaign climbto 38% of the latino vote in 2020?what did you do? >> i think one thing we diddifferently compared to other campaigns, was, to begin with westarted early. i think it was 18 months beforenovember that we began our campaign.we have seen campaigns that start too late.not only do they start late, but -- suppose, in 2012, you have acandidate like mitt romney. they are peeping --they are bringing people to florida from massachusetts, likecarpetbaggers, if you will. that was not the case inflorida. we had over 150 people in thestate. alex garcia and i are bothcuban-americans. that will show you theimportance latinos had in the campaign.and our team, like i said, were not carpetbaggers.they were people from this community, people that are knownhere, who have links to the communities.it is easier for someone who has been living in orlando for 30years to have those relationships with the communityinstead of having someone who has never met anybody and doesnot know the difference. >> kevin, is that one of thereasons why, for instance, knowing south florida well andknowing that there are many people here from venezuela,nicaragua, cubans, was the topic of socialism used against biden?>> my grandmother used to say tell me who you are with, and iwill tell you who you are. biden and the democrats did abad job of disassociating themselves from these people.when you are seeing what they are pushing, the laws they arepromoting, and when we see the delay to react to cuba, thatgives us pause. most hispanics in florida fledsocialism and communism. these ideas that people likebernie sanders, who, before, i would say were extremists andthe party are now more the norm. >> but clearly that is not thesame thing. talking about communism the wayyou and i see it with a cuban tater ship is very differentfrom democratic socialism as espoused by bernie sanders orother people in the democratic party.but nonetheless who use that label of socialism.>> in my opinion, that is how it begins.we sought in our own countries. that is how it began, and we seewhere we have come. we have not created what thedemocrats said, we are amplifying what they themselvessaid. >> many latinos were offended bydonald trump, who said mexican immigrants were criminals and rapists, and because he said that some immigrants were coming fromgarbage countries. why support donald trump aftersaying these things that insulted so many people?>> i think hispanics like me, who supported the president, sawthe actions he took during his presidency.we saw a historic amount of money being sent to per thericoh -- puerto rico after hurricane maria.we saw a president in favor of law and order, keeping ourcitys safe, so we could work and flares.i think that is why people supported trump.we saw historic unemployment in every category, obviously beforethe coronavirus, but we saw a historically low unemploymentrate and a high rate of employment and our communities.we were living a better life in our communities under hisadministration. >> i just have a few seconds.how do you think latinos will vote in the future?we had 38% of the votes in 2020. what do you expect in 2024?>> if republicans want to continue winning latino votes,they need to work for it, they need to do it not a month beforethe election but to be in these communities and show why -- howdo you say -- earn their votes. and i think that they are goingto vote for us because they voted for us last time.we need to win the vote. we need to ask for that vote.if you do not ask for it, youre not going to get it.>> thank you for being with us. after that interview, you got toask yourself what mistakes have democrats made and how can theyregain the hispanic vote? we are joined by lina hidalgo,judge of harris county in texas. let me begin by asking you aboutthat 38% of latino votes that donald trump obtained in thelast election. that surprised me.is it the fall of the democrats for promising too much and notfulfilling those promises? >> well, democrats, we haveseveral goals that benefit not only latinos but all thecommunity. goals involving education,economic opportunity, justice, the environment, etc.the challenge is to communicate that vision, communicate thoseprojects to the latino community.we cannot assume the latino community will vote fordemocrats simply because they are latinos.we have to reach out to those communities, spend time withthem, invest in those communication projects, andthat, i think, is what was lacking in these last elections.the necessary investment to communicate that.>> what is happening in texas and other states whenrepublicans are trying to restrict the vote from latinosand other minorities? what is your plan and how areyou reacting? >> republicans have seen,particularly in urban areas, the most populated areas of thestate, the democratic vote is growing.so it is impossible to deny politics are not involved inthose efforts. here in harris county, beingimplemented, 24 hour voting. we tripled the number of pollingplaces. and we reached a record level ofvoter participation. the highest in 30 years, interms of percentages. it has been incredible.they are responding by eliminating those innovations aswell as criminalizing simple errors.these are proposals that intimidate voter participation.>> is it possible that texas might become a democratic state?it is purple now, but do you think it may become a bluestate? >> yes, that possibility exists.that is why this battle is being fought regarding voting access.we also have to remember this is something bigger.some of these proposals of voter suppression involve that liethat there was massive fraud in the 2020 elections.some politicians in the republican party have seen that,in the extreme right, that the extreme right likes hearing thatlie that there was electoral fraud, that president biden didnot win, all of that. so they are feeding that lie,strengthening that lie, and weakening democracy in theprocess, weakening the credibility that the electoralsystem has in our country. >> you have been in your rolefor a little over two years. what keeps you up at night?what worries you most about harris county and the houstonarea? >> today, i think a lot aboutvaccinations. schools will be reopening againin august, and here, only about 35% of children under 18 happenvaccinated. we know that the vaccine iseffective. we know it is necessary.and we need to make sure all of these children, the ones between12 and 18, can be vaccinated, so that they do not miss school, sothey do not get sick with covid. so we are trying to incentivizepeople to get vaccinated, including college scholarships,and we are talking to other leaders throughout the countryto see what else we might be able to do to reach thosevaccine goals. >> you are convinced that, inthe autumn, there should be in person classes for all childrenin texas? >> it is a difficult balance.it is important for children to get back to normal, but we needto take safety measures. yes, it is important they be inin-person classes, but first there should be vaccinations.children over 12 should be vaccinated.second, we should take those precautions, precautions ofwearing face masks and social distancing.if we have a lot of children in a classroom close to each otherwithout face masks, we are simply, practically asking for amassive infection, so that is what we have to prevent for thehealth of the children and the community.>> thank you for being on the show.when we return, pepe aguilar is>> this thursday, one of the best-known musical dynasties inspanish music will be performing.talking about pepe aguilar and his children, angela andleonardo. that must be a philosophy ofwork and life in that family, because during the pandemic,instead of resting, they were perhaps more productive thanever before. as soon as they could, theybegan offering concerts again. let me begin with the most basicquestion. what did you do during thepandemic, pepe? >> well, ill answer, jorge.first, thank you for inviting us.during the pandemic, we worked, brother.we worked more than perhaps if they had not been a pandemic.>> is it true that you composed, routes 87 songs as well asproducing angela and leonardos albums?>> yes, i wrote a lot of songs. as well as angela and leonardo,they wrote a lot. but i produced 76 songs in thattime. because there were televisionspecials, online specials, several records, includingangelas record, leonardos record, my record.other performers producing in my company.yeah, it was 76 songs. >> angela, what was your screenswith your family? do you feel like singing aloneafter spending so much time with them during the pandemic?[laughter] >> what a difficult question.the truth is i loved spending time with my family, singingwith my family, performing with my family, especially now.it is awesome to be family but also be independent.to be able to make such good music.>> wow. >> tell me about your record.i know you are going to sing a song for premios juventud.>> it is my launch as a singer-songwriter.all the songs on the record i wrote by myself or with myfriends all with my father. it is the most personal stuffive done in my career. i will perform one of the songsi wrote during the pandemic at premios juventud.>> after one of your concerts, you posted on instagram -- howdo you perform? what you ask from people who goto your concerts after the pandemic?are you afraid? >> more than fear, we arelearning how to live with this new reality.because the situation has been politicized.different cities have different roles.you do not know if people who are coming to see you, somepeople, perhaps, do not believe in the virus.others do not want to get vaccinated.so these situations, you have to learn to live with.we are just starting. i cant say this is what we aredoing -- were still learning. for example, in texas, where weare now, it is like nothing happened.people are walking around without face masks.concert venues opened quite a while ago.then you go somewhere else, and people are still reticent.in the united states, 50% of the population have been vaccinated,which is very low. i cannot believe people are notgetting vaccinated here. >> i want to ask what are youdoing? a lot of the people not beingvaccinated are young like you. what decision did you make?>> well, as soon as i was able to be vaccinated, i went and gotvaccinated, literally. i was part of a campaign tomotivate young people in los angeles to get vaccinated.i think it is super, super, super important to be aware ofthe importance of being vaccinated at this moment.there are a lot of long-lasting effects.i will not go into that, but people should get vaccinated.>> what did you do? >> the same thing.we all made the decision to get vaccinated, because we saw it asour way to return to a world close to normal.and after being vaccinated, it opened doors for us to continueworking, continue traveling. everyone i know who is close tome, who does not want to get vaccinated, i encourage them todo so, in the most -- in the most spectral way possible.ive done it. ive seen the benefits itbrought me. >> thanks to all three of you.it will be exciting to see the three of you in premios juventud. thank you and congratulations.>> thank you. con jorge ramos with an audience live thisthursday at 7:00 on univision. when we return, the space raceamong>> for the next generation of dreamers.if we can do this, just imagine what you can do.>> that was recorded in space. the space race --multimillionaire richard branson took the lead.branton became the first person to fly to space in a ship paidby himself. he surpassed jeff bezos ofamazon and elon musk of tesla. cesar munoz addresses thiscurious space competition. ♪♪ videosand interviews on univision.com /alpunto or follow us oninstagram, facebook, and twitter.until next week when, together, we get to the point, "al punto

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