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Al Punto con Jorge Ramos - 11 de julio, 2021

El presidente López Obrador asegura que tiene otros datos sobre la ola de violencia en México. Continúa la represión en Nicaragua por parte de Daniel Ortega. El presidente Biden tiene un plan para generar nuevos trabajos.
12 Jul 2021 – 12:00 AM EDT
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>> thats get to the point, "al punto --lets get to the point, "al punto.">> the mexican live in a bubble.his government could become the most violent in the modernhistory of the country, but the president says he has differentdata. >> they killed three mothers andsix children. >> the lebaron family lost ninefamily members in a massacre at the hands of organized crime.they have a message for the president of mexico.>> this is a time to negotiate your departure.>> this is lesther alemán. he was arrested by the danielortega regime. his mother speaks with us.bill cosby was released on a technicality.what does this mean for the #mettooo movement?president biden has a plan to create jobs.the energy secretary tells us how it will benefit latinos.and della koval -- angélica vale will receive a star on thehollywood walk of fame. we begin now.♪ >> lets get to the point, "alpunto," with jorge ramos. >> lets get to the point, "alpunto." the president of mexico haddifferent data. this week, i traveled to mexicocity to participate in the daily press conference that andrésmanuel lópez obrador gives every day, monday through friday.it is the first time -- third time i attended why theseconferences. i wanted to ask about thethousands of deaths under his administration since he arrivedin power, over 86,000 mexicans have been murdered.mexico is the fourth largest country -- is the country withthe fourth largest number of coronavirus deaths.lópez obrador had different data.>> i was here in january, 2020, to ask you about the terriblewave of violence in the country, and you told me the following --i am quoting you. "this year, there will beresults." well, after over a year, therehave been results, but negative ones, mr. president.your government is on its way to becoming the most violent one inthe history of mexico. over 86,000 deaths since youtook office, according to official data.if things continue this way, they will be more deaths.femicides continued to increase compared to last year, andoutside the bubble of the national palace, the country isnot in peace. almost 100 mexicans are beingkilled per day. you did not the full yourpromise of not militarizing the national guard, at almost halfof your term has ended, and you continue blaming formerpresidents for what you have been unable to do.do you think that your strategy of hugs, not bullets, has been afailure? will you ask for help, because,until now, you have not succeeded?>> look, i have other data. and it is not a bubble.i do not like lying to myself. that is something thatdemagogues do, and hypocrites. we have had problems reducinghomicides as we would like, but -- and this is important -- wehave managed to contain the growth that had been occurringin homicides. in fact, there has been alowering since we arrived. perhaps marginal, 3%.>> but what i am saying is you cannot say there are 100 peopledying per day and that that is a success.>> of course it is not an easy issue.ive explained that. we inherited run fruit -- rottenrufruit. it is not i am blaming withoutreason the previous presidents, but you know well that themanagement of national security was practically in the hands oforganized crime. and that has gone on for a longtime. this is what we areaccomplishing. >> but there are killings, thereare deaths, 1000 per month. >> but not the same.the are no massacres anymore in this country.>> what about -- >> these are face-offs betweencriminals. but it is not the state that wasthe main entity violating human rights.>> but one of the main problems of this country is violence, andthis is your responsibility now, mr. president.>> yes, yes, and i work every day -->> but they have not been results.>> of course there have been. i respect your point of view,but i do not share it. >> this data is from your ownadministration. >> i think the data you receivedwas incorrect. i have other data.>> there cannot be other data, because it came from youradministration. i want to ask if you will takeresponsibility for the poor administration of the pandemic.>> i do not agree with you. >> mexico is fourth in coviddeaths despite being 10th in population.you are talking 229 thousand deaths when, really, the deathsassociated to covid are over 351,000, paired -- according toyour own webpage. i do not understand why thereare two different statistics. why not say that the number ofcovids are much higher -- covid deaths are much higher?>> it is a real shame that a journalist like you would havemisinformation, but the source of the bottom -->> mexico has the fourth highest number of covid deaths in theworld. >> this is what professionally,jorge, needs to be taken into account.being objective. >> yes.>> and ethical. these are data -- barely twoweeks ago, the united states stopped being --the great nation the united states is, the superpower it is,it stopped being the country that had more deaths per millionthen mexico. >> are you telling me thatpandemic has been handled well, with so many deaths?>> yes, of course. i was a better than otherplaces. >> that is possible, but youtold mexicans to go to restaurants 11 days after theworld health organization declared a pandemic.on july 7 -- >> why wouldnt i acceptresponsibility if i am president of mexico?>> what youre saying is that things are going well.how can you say that with so many deaths?how can you say that to the family members of so manyvictims? >> i do not agree with you.i respect what you say. i do not share that opinion.and i feel that there is a desire to question ouradministration. our conscious is clean.>> but it is questioning how you are handling the pandemic, and iappreciate this opportunity. that is our job, to questionyou. thank you.>> there at the press conference, the president spokeabout the massacre -- in 2019, nine members of the lebarónfamily were killed on a mexican highway in sonora.the lebarón were ambushed and killed, some even burned.this week, andrés manuel lópez obrador, president of mexico,talked about the arrests made after the massacre.two family members heard what he said and do not agree.thank you for being with us. lets begin with the basics.could you tell me what happened november 4, 2019?>> on november 4, there was a massacre in sonora -- bavispe,sonora, near the border with the state of chihuahua where mydaughter lived. they killed three women and sixchildren and left 20 orphans. it was a cartel attack, anattack of organized crime from the state of chihuahua that hasbeen more than proven. i can prove it.it was my daughter and four of my grandchildren.they were killed and burned. we do not even know if they weredead when they were set on fire. that is known -- that isunknown. >> who did you lose?>> let me say that the daughter of my uncle, my cousin, donnalangford, mother of 13, she and two of her children weremassacred. and christina langford was alsomassacred. and i will tell you, jorge, noone wanted to call the authorities.it was our own family that called the authorities.after eight hours of being in communication with stateauthorities in sonora and chihuahua, they never arrived.what we are talking about is explicit complicity with thegovernments of chihuahua and sonora and organized crime.over 3500 rounds were fired. >> it was a terrible tragedy of2019. let me leap to last monday wheni was able to speak with mexican president andrés manuel lópezobrador about your case. >> it was regrettable, sad whatoccurred in bavispe. we arrested 20 people.20. and, 10 days ago, the head ofall of them was arrested. so there is a big differencebetween now and before. before, crime was committed, andthere was no punishment. there was impunity.>> what do you want to tell the president?>> he said that the case had been solved.then i must not understand what justice is.we personally pick casings. i was with fbi agents.i know what i am talking about. there are over 100 people whowere involved, and for the president to say to you that thecase is solved? well, maybe he thinks it issolved, but we are here seeking justice.>> it looks like it is a policy that has been our experiencesince my brother and his brother-in-law were killed in2009. we are not going to remainsilent. we are not going to allow thepresident to say, with impunity, that they have done their job,and we are asking the united states to intervene.>> what you are saying is that there are more than 100 peopleinvolved in that massacre and that, so far, how many havebeen arrested? >> it looks like they have been20 arrested. others, 25, are being accused ofhomicide. but as you know, in mexico,people can be accused of things, but justice never comes.impunity is almost 100%. we cannot allow that to happenin this case. our family paid with blood.we would not be men if we allow the authorities to allow thiscase to go with impunity. >> you are also americancitizens. what are you asking the unitedstates? >> i really want to talk to theambassador, the new ambassador, because christopher landau didspeak with us and told us he would leave no stone unturned.i like how he told the president the truth.and you know how he said to you he has other data?if i told my wife that i have different data, she would hit mewith a frying pan. that is not fair.>> it is not just our family members, jorge.you know full well the data. there are over 90,000 mexicanswho have been killed by criminals who have had impunity.they do not even cover their faces anymore.that is what we are dealing with in chihuahua.>> i do not know much, but there is a plan i heard they are goingto release another $85 million, but here, the people here -- iknow them personally. many of us in this case have notreceived a single penny. so the idea that that moneyshould not go toward militarizing police or somethinglike that, i am in favor of that in the united states, and ithink it is time to find a way for the american government towork towards justice. >> mexican president andrésmanuel lópez obrador says that mexico is living in peace.what is your experience? >> that may be the way he isliving. he cant walk on the streetwithout security. it is an insult to all of us wholive under this danger. yesterday, my brother saw a bodyon the side of the road going from lebarón to the unitedstates. we cannot allow them to livewith impunity. they accepted their post, andthey cannot lie to us every day. >> i will end with you.what do you want to tell president lópez obrador?>> i just want to say, please, dont use the massacre as anexample in a speech he is giving, because i think heshould be putting everyone who is responsible on trial.the prosecutors -- if he is going to lie, he should havedata. we experienced the sufferingevery day. >> adrian and julian lebarón,thank you for being here. >> god bless all of you.>> hello to everybody. >> when we return, daniel ortegahas arrested a student activist, lesther alemán.we speak with his mother. and bill cosby is set free.how does this he is recovering from intestinal surgery.he thanked believers for their prayers.we return now to jorge ramos. ♪>> repression in nicaragua under daniel ortega continues.one of the most recent to be arrested is lesther alemán, ayoung man who, in 2018, faced off with ortega and asked forhis resignation. this is what lesther said.>> we are being persecuted. we are students.our people have died, have disappeared, have beenkidnapped. that has been us.this is not a place of dialogue. this is a place of negotiation,negotiating your departure, because that is what the peoplewant. >> his mother joins us frommanagua, nicaragua. thank you for joining us.you were home when lesther was arrested.what was that like? what did they tell you?>> yes, he was with me. i had gone to take some thingsfrom my house get i said -- from my house.i said dont come, but he said he had to be with me.when i arrived, i looked for the things -- we had not even beenthere for two hours, and i found some things and cleaned up alittle bit when we heard some vehicles enter, and i lookedout. and i said what is going on?he said it is the police. at that moment, in front of myhouse, there were three police cars.they got out of their trucks, destroyed the gate.i said i am going out. i went out and said what isgoing on, who are you looking for?but at that point, my son was behind me, and they said tomeet, and he said to me, do not worry, i will open.when he opens, about seven grabbed him, pushed him around.one of them hit him from behind. >> what did they say to you andlesther? >> i said what is going on?my son is not a murderer, not a criminal, what are you doing, doyou have an order? >> and they do not answer.they do not answer anything. that is when i see they hit him.and one of them was wearing a balaclava.he pushed me and two women police officers grabbed me, andhe sees this, and he asks please dont hit my mother up therethere were about seven of them. >> where is he now?were you able to see him? >> no.no, no, no. just at the reception area.i couldnt even send him a bottle of water.that is what they said that they can receive, water and somepersonal hygiene items, but i cannot even give him that.>>, in 2018 lesther was -- in 2018, lesther was asking for afree nicaragua. daniel ortega and hisadministration took that as a criticism.recently, lesther, your son, said that ortega was a woundedbeast and that he would rather face reason or death.do you think this is why he was arrested?>> no, it was not that. it has been going on since 2018.he felt he was disrespected and offended.my son has not broken any law. my son is innocent.he is a student who graduated. he is not an insurrectionistlike they said. he has been charged with a coupattempt. he is innocent.>> what are you afraid of? what do you think might happento lesther? >> well, torture, possiblydeath. >> do you think your son is indanger of dying? >> yes.the way they act, i would not be surprised by anything.>> i will end with this -- what would you like to say to danielortega or rosario murillo at this moment?>> i would like them to free them.they know they are innocent. they want a free country, not acountry with repression and death and persecution.>> thank you for speaking with us.we hope lesther will be released soon, as well as many otherjournalists and opposition. >> may they all be free.>> we now go to south america. we talk to the current presidentof peru. there still is not officialconfirmation that pedro castillo will be the next president.patricia janiot, my colleague, spoke with the president andthis is the message she has for his successor -- he has for hissuccessor. >> i have a lot of advice.try to transmit my experience. ive got perspective as apresident and former congressman.and all of this comes after years of looking at thesituation in my country and other countries, to distillthings to the most important actions.the next president will have me to offer as much advice as theperson wants. >> the interview with patriciais on the youtube and facebook pages of "al punto."bill cosby is released. what does that mean for thewomen who accused him?♪ >> comedian bill cosby wasreleased from prison last week. he was released by atechnicality, an agreement with a former prosecutor preventedhim from being sent to jail. he served two years, and cosbyhas never asked forgiveness from his main accuser.how does this affect future accusations from other woman?ana maría archila is with us. more than talking about billcosby, what is the message that his release gives other women?>> well, without a doubt, this release is very moralizing --demoralizing. because to get bill cosby toeven get a sentence was a victory for women that he abusedfor many, many years. over 60 women told their storiesof abuse at the hands of bill cosby, and he confessed, in adeposition, about one of the cases.so it is demoralizing to see how the judicial system can releasesomeone who obviously has caused a lot of hurt to a lot of womenfor a long time. >> you were talking about 60women who say they were sexually abused by him.in the latin community, this is more complicated.after hearing this, a lot of people feel demoralized.what is your recommendation, your path to take what goesnext? >> i think that, as a woman whosuffered sexual violence as a child, what helped me to heal,to some extent, was the support and community from other peoplewho have experienced the same situation, to have theopportunity to tell my story, to have the opportunity to bebelieved by other people. we all have the capacity to helppeople who have been victimized sexually to heal.first, to ask people to take that role, to help people telltheir stories and heal in the process.i think that we need to continue insisting that the judicialsystem, the criminal system must change the way it has treatedvictims of sexual violence, because, for my entire life, andgenerations before, the weight of -- the burden of proof hasalways been on victims. >> i just have a few seconds,but what you are saying is very important.you say that the first step is having the courage to tell yourstory. >> it is to have the courage tohear those stories, to say i am here to support you, and if wehave been victimized, to find the people who will support us.for me, that has been a process of healing.i do not think everybody has to to say what they are not readyto say, but i want to emphasize the healing impact that i hadwhen i was able to integrate that aspect of my life and thestory of my life and lessen its power.>> thank you for your bravery. >> thank you.>> when we return, her mother received a star on the hollywoodwalk of fame, and now she will as well.and the united states governm♪ >> mexican actress angélica valewill have a star on the hollywood walk of fame, butbehind the news there is a lot of work.she is the daughter of angélica maría and oro valley -- raúlvale, but few people know how difficult it was for her tosucceed in mexico and the united states.angelica has received many nos in her career, but she has neverallowed that to define her. she is here on the show with us.thank you for being with us. i will try to do somethingdifferent. >> i think it is perfect.>> i have interviewed you because of many awards, manyroles. i want to try to understand alittle more about you. i was reading that your mothersaid the following -- about you. it took her a lot of work in hercareer. it is painful to see how she hascried and suffered. i wish things had been easierfor her and her career. she always heard "no" manytimes. i was not expecting that.i thought it would have been relatively easy.>> no, it was never easy for me. i always heard "no" a lot.i had to fight for what i wanted, from getting a roll,being noticed at televisa. i always wanted to be intelevision. peter was my first love.my grandmother and i would produce plays --theater was my first love. my grandmother and i wouldproduce plays. it was wonderful to grow up thatway. i would not change any of that,especially not now. >> i once read that the bestrevenge is success. now you are getting a star inhollywood. when it was announced, what didyou think? >> well, i started crying.>> did you think "i made it" -- you cried?>> yes, i started crying like a little girl.i was surprised, because i thought there would be a specialmention for my mother. i thought that was going on.and then they said my name. i started crying like a littlegirl, because i couldnt believe it.jorge, you know that, when you start working in the unitedstates, in spanish, you do not think that people who speakenglish know who you are. i thought they did not care.>> congratulations. i think it is good to acceptsuccess when it comes. and i do not know if everythingyou have done makes sense now. why did you leave mexico?>> i left mexico -- >> and why did you stay here?>> i was trying to find myself, jorge.because i was not satisfied with who i was as a human being.i do not know where i was. and i thought i will take asabbatical year, according to me, and then i will come back tomexico. and i ended up staying here.i got work first at univision, and i stayed.i stayed, and because of love, i stayed longer, and i am stillhere. >> i used to say that, when iwas a child, i wanted to be a soccer player and a rock star,but never raised my hand and said i wanted to be animmigrant. i know you did not want to leavemexico, but there is something that pushes you out of thecountry and something that pulls you into another.>> yes. i was pulled in by the peace ihad in miami. in five years in miami, i foundwonderful piece. perhaps the traffic in mexicocity pushed me out. but i did find peace in miami.and i also found myself. it was great, as a human being,to leave home and be alone. i grew.i grew a lot as a human being, and that helped me have what ihave today. >> in the pandemic, did you feelyou had to reinvent yourself? to do something different?you have done almost everything. you are very young, and you havedone almost everything. is there a second stage?>> i am dying to write, to go backstage.that is one of my dreams. and i think that life has givenme opportunities. i never imagined doing radio,and that literally saved me during the pandemic.that is all i had left. theater was canceled, everythingwas canceled. and radio saved my life.>> let me end with this, and maybe we can add a touch ofhumor. when i found out, i thought thiscannot be true -- is it true that, when you get a star inhollywood, you have to pay a lot of money?>> yes, yes. >> it is not a gift, you have topay for it? >> you have to pay for themaintenance of the star. >> is that true?can you tell me how much? or not?>> no, why should i tell you? i am still looking for sponsors,ive got a year. >> so you have to pay for yourgift. >> it is like paying for yourgift a little bit. but if you think how it is goingto be a star that will be there long after you die, it is worthpaying for? >> angélica, congratulations.you have no idea how happy i am. >> thank you, jorge.i am sending you a big kiss. >>♪ >> if you are looking for a job,you may be able to find one soon , building a road or a bridge orbroadband internet. the biden administration reachedan agreement with republicans to approve a plan for over $500billion. this infrastructure plan wouldnot only build projects but will create many jobs.we invited jennifer granholm, secretary of energy, to explainhow this could help the latino community.thank you so much for being with us today.>> you bet, thank you. >> so the president was able tomake a deal with senators from both parties, and as you know,latinos where one of the groups most affected by the pandemic.how will the latino community that if it from thisinfrastructure plan? >> well, first of all, this isgoing to create a large number of jobs.we know that 1 out of 5 workers in energy are latinos.and passionate about this. and yes, they will be roads andbridges. 1 out of 6 construction jobs inenergy -- look, latinos are already very active inconstruction, as you know. they are 27% of the labor force.so clean energy jobs and traditional infrastructure jobswill benefit the community enormously.>> howell of this plan affect climate change?i have heard you are obsessed with solving the climateproblem. how does this plan relate toclimate change? >> the president wants to get100% of our energy from clean sources by 2035 and zeroemissions by 2050, and having a plan will make sure that theunited states is at the forefront and will face climatechange and be a leader when it comes to jobs that will becreated as a result of this. >> let me ask you -- you havesaid you are working so that, in this country, there is clean andaccessible country, but when we have carbon industries andpetroleum industries, how do you manage this?>> well, clearly, the department of energy is looking forsolutions. we have a lot of people who workin the fossil fuel industry, and many people working in the cleanenergy industry. what we want is to get peoplewho work in fossil fuels, we want to thank them for giving usenergy for the last 100 years, but we want them to be part ofthe future of energy in the united states.that is why what the president has negotiated in thisbipartisan agreement is the capacity to demonstrate thepotential to eliminate co2 and to give jobs to communities.>> i have one final question on climate change.do you think there is a relationship between thecollapse in miami beach and hurricane elsa with climatechange? >> i think you have to separatethem out. we do not know the causes of thecollapse of the building. these families are going throughhell. we want to make sure they getprecise answers. there will be investigations,engineering studies, but the fact that we are seeing anincrease in hurricanes and an increase in extreme climateevents in this country is, of course, a result of climatechange. in 1980, as a country, we spentabout $17 billion per year in cleaning up these extremeclimate events. last year, we spent $95 billionafter these events. they are more frequent, they aremore severe. we have to deal with climatechange. >> secretary, thank you fortalking with us. >> you are welcome, thank youfor inviting me. >> to end, some music.we have been living with covid for a year and a half, but somepeople still have doubts. césar muñoz set them to music.♪ ♪ interviewson univision.com/alpunto or follow us on facebook,instagram, and twitter. so until next week, when,together, we get to the point, "al punto."

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