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Changes Ahead:  Top Universities  Look For a New Approach To College Admissions

Changes Ahead:  Top Universities  Look For a New Approach To College Admissions

Getting into college requires so much work these days. Teenagers have to do extra credit, numerous essays, go through a long and difficult admission process, and cross their fingers to get accepted. This is also a very stressful process for the parents involved. Even for kids with good grades and great opportunities, the admission process is not …

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Getting into college requires so much work these days. Teenagers have to do extra credit, numerous essays, go through a long and difficult admission process, and cross their fingers to get accepted. This is also a very stressful process for the parents involved.

Even for kids with good grades and great opportunities, the admission process is not an easy one. But there is hope!   The Harvard Graduate School of Education released a report called Turning the Tide, which was endorsed by dozens of universities and colleges that proposes big changes in the way colleges admit new students every year.

The new approach that Harvard suggests (and that is support of many other top Universities) includes some of these changes:

  1. Promoting more meaningful contributions to others, community service and engagement with the public good.
  2. Assessing students’ ethical engagements and contributions to others in ways that reflect varying types of family and community contributions across race, culture and class.
  3. Redefining achievement in ways that levels the playing field for economically diverse students and reduces excessive achievement pressure.

This means that the admission’s process will review  the student’s contributions to others, as well as community service.
Turning the Tide is the first step in a two-year campaign that seeks to substantially reshape the existing college admissions process, explains Harvard in a press release launched last week.

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These days it is harder for kids from underprivideldged  families to be admitted at the top colleges in the U.S., but this new approach can make a difference for many families.

“Escalating achievement pressure  is not healthy for our youth. Young people are suffering  from  higher rates of depression, anxiety, and substance abuse as they juggle demands of their lives. Many students, especially those from low income families are often discouraged due to limited access to the resources perceived as necessary for the selective college admissions,” explains Kedra Shop, Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management!at the University of Michigan.

For the past years, admissions have been based on test scores,  AP/IB classes, and extracurriculars activities, that make the students enroll in many activities they really don’t to.

Harvard (and all other 85 colleges around America)  prefers students to be more involved in their community, doing good things for others (and this includes watching youngest siblings, working to support their families and helping at home) and having less anxiety and stress trying to making it to college.

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De la tragedia al gozo. Esta madre bloguera nos muestra cómo cambian las actitudes del primer día de clases al pasar de los años.
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